Nineteenth Century

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Colonial Period

Nineteenth Century

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Twentieth Century

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A number of our 19th-century offerings in American Literature
are made available through the Thoreau Society at Walden Pond,
of whom Monongahela Books is an Affiliate. All such titles
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Weisbuch, Robert, ATLANTIC DOUBLE-CROSS: AMERICAN LITERATURE AND BRITISH INFLUENCE IN THE AGE OF EMERSON. University of Chicago Press, 1989., Fine, like new. PAPERBACK. Chapters on Melville, Whitman, Thoreau, Emerson, Henry James, and their relationship to various European contemporaries. OUT OF PRINT.

$25.00




















[Whitman] Justin Kaplan, WALT WHITMAN: A Life. NEW copy. TRADE PAPERBACK. First Perennial Classics Edition, 2003. Origianlly published 1980. Photographs, extensive notes, index, 429 pages. "Whitman's genius, passions, poetry, and androgynous sensibility entwined to create an exuberant life amid the turbulent American mid-nineteenth century. In vivid detail, Kaplan examines the mysterious selves of the enigmatic man who celebrated the freedom and dignity of the individual and sang the praises of democracy and the brotherhood of man." Justin Kaplan is the author of Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. "

$15.95



[Whitman] Justin Kaplan, WALT WHITMAN: A Life. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. Simon & Schuster, 1980. First Edition. Photographs, extensive notes, index, 429 pages. "Whitman's genius, passions, poetry, and androgynous sensibility entwined to create an exuberant life amid the turbulent American mid-nineteenth century. In vivid detail, Kaplan examines the mysterious selves of the enigmatic man who celebrated the freedom and dignity of the individual and sang the praises of democracy and the brotherhood of man." Justin Kaplan is the author of Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award." Originally published at $15, now OUT OF PRINT.

$25.00



[Whitman] Jerome Loving, WALT WHITMAN: The Song of Himself. VG. TRADE PAPERBACK. In new condition except for rear cover, one corner of which has been bent back and creased. University of California Press. Photographs, notes, bibliography, index, 568 pages. "Walt Whitman: The Song of Himself is the first full-length critical biography of Walt Whitman in more than forty years. Jerome Loving makes use of recently unearthed archival evidence and newspaper writings to present the most accurate, complete, and complex portrait of the poet to date. This biography affords fresh, often revelatory, insights into many aspects of the poet's life, including his attitudes toward the emerging urban life of America, his relationships with his family members, his developing notions of male-male love, his attitudes toward the vexed issue of race, and his insistence on the union of American states. Virtually every chapter presents material that was previously unknown or unavailable, and Whitman emerges as never before, in all his complexity as a corporal, cerebral, and spiritual being. Loving gives us a new Poet of Democracy, one for the twenty-first century." In print at $19.95.

$15.00



[Whitman] David S. Reynolds (ed), AN HISTORICAL GUIDE TO WALT WHITMAN. NEW copy. TRADE PAPERBACK. Oxford University Press, 2000. 280 pages.

$19.95






For books about
Walt Whitman
in the Civil War,


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Williams, Catherine, FALL RIVER: An Authentic Narrative. NY: 1993, Oxford University Press. VG Trade paperback $17.50 . "Catharine Williams (1787-1872) lived most of her life in Rhode Island, where she supported herself and her daughter by a productive literary career. Her most compelling work, Fall River, last published in 1833, recreates a notorious incident in the ill-fated town of Fall River, Massachusetts: the trial of a Methodist minister for the murder of a pregnant mill worker whom it was suspected he had seduced. Williams's investigative report offers a vivid contemporary view of the lives of poor "factory girls" and of clerical corruption in the industrial towns of early New England. While based in fact, the book raises themes of sexual and religious hypocrisy and exploitation that may be compared with those of novels like The Coquette, Uncle Tom's Cabin, and The Scarlet Letter. At the same time, the author's mixture of journalism, biography, fiction, and exhortation makes this "authentic narrative" an unusual challenge to traditional notions of literary form and yields fresh insights into the nature of early American women's writing."

$17.50



Colonial Period

Nineteenth Century

A ~ D
E ~ M
N ~ S
T
U ~ Z

Twentieth Century

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