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{Abbott} Scott, Robert Garth, ed. FALLEN LEAVES: The Civil War Letters of Major Henry Livermore Abbott. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Kent State University Press. 1992). Illustrations.
~~~ From Booknews: "Abbott, one of the company of young Union officers from Harvard that included Oliver Wendell Holmes, Charles Russell Lowell, and Robert Gould Shaw, fought with the 20th Massachusetts Infantry from October 1861 to May 6, 1864, when he was killed in action. This collection of Abbott's wartime letters to his family and friends, the majority published here for the first time, is accompanied by an introduction and epilogue by Robert Garth Scott and by 36 photographs."

$25.00



[Benedict] Ward, Eric (ed), ARMY LIFE IN VIRGINIA: The Civil War Letters of George C. Benedict. NEW copy. hardcover with dust jacket. (Stackpole Books, 2001). 272 pages.
~~~ "George G. Benedict was one of thousands of young men who enlisted for the Union cause in the late summer of 1862 when the outcome of the Civil War was yet to be decided. But in addition to his duties as a soldier, Benedict also worked as a correspondent for his hometown newspaper, the Burlington (Vermont) Free Press. Benedict's thirty-one letters gave the folks back home a firsthand account of army life in the Civil War. Now, by supplementing these letters with official documents, newspaper accounts, and comrade's letters, editor Eric Ward expands on this account, providing a fuller and more accurate picture of army life in Virginia."

$25.00



Britton, Wiley (Late, Sixth Kansas Cavalry), MEMOIRS OF THE REBELLION ON THE BORDER, 1863. Bison Book, University of Nebraska Press, Bison Books, Reprinted from the original 1882 edition by Cushing, Thomas & Co., Chicago., NEW. 1st Bison Book edition. 458 pp. "...the best and most accurate first-person account of the long-overlooked western border war of 1863, presenting a detailed perspective of events on the frontiers of Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas and the Indian territory. Britton describes some of the key engagements fought in the trans-Mississippi theatre, including the battles of Pea Ridge, Cane Hill, Prairie Grove, and Cabin Creek, as well as numerous lesser actions. ...(though not published until 1882), it is actually a diary written during the decisive year of 1863 and then rewritten by him as a published memoir... Britten recorded the drills, movements, raids, expeditions, reconnaissances, and campaigns while writing of the hopes, fears and thoughts of his comrades... In addition he wrote in detail of the untamed and wartorn regions through which he rode with his regiment, noting the geography, environment and setting of the seldom-described trans-Mississippi theatre.

$45.00



Carley, Kenneth, MINNESOTA IN THE CIVIL WAR. Ross & Haines, Minneapolis, 1961., F/NF. As new except that price is clipped from DJ. First Edition. 6 x 8.75. Photographs, B&W and color plates, maps, bibliography, index, 168 pp. Table of Contents as follows: Introduction; Gallantry at Gettysburg; Storming Missionary Ridge; Capture of Little Rock; Victory at Vicksburg; Crises at Corinth; Breakthrough at Nashville; Hardship at Helena; Chronology; Roster; Minnesota's Civil War Monuments; Bibliography; Index.

$35.00










[Grant] Maihafer, Harry J. THE GENERAL AND THE JOURNALISTS: Ulysses S. Grant, Horace Greeley, and Charles Dana . Washington DC: Brassey's, 1998. As new in as new dust jacket, black boards. 1st edition.
~~~ As both general and president, Grant felt the full power of the press. By a remarkable twist of fate, not only his wartime successes but also his peacetime failures were directly influenced by Greeley and Dana, two of the greatest figures of American journalism. The trio provides a fascinating contrast: Grant the simple soldier, basically unchanged from the time he left West Point until the day he died, honor untarnished but reputation sullied by men in whom he placed too much trust; Greeley the idealistic, brilliant, opinionated kingmaker, alternating in wartime between hawk and dove, forever shifting in his allegiances; and Dana the perverse, pragmatic, cynical intellectual, one of the first to emphasize news over editorials. The General and the Journalists follows the three powerful men as their paths cross during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Vividly portraying the 19th century era of "personal journalism," when Greeley and Dana became major players on the national stage, Harry J. Maihafer shows how the media greatly affected the conduct of the Civil War and, to this day, has shaped the public's perception of Lincoln's, Johnson's, and Grant's presidencies. Extensive quotes from contemporary newspapers convey a feeling of immediacy, bringing to life a new and important aspect of Grant's career , one of intense drama and bitter conflict.
~~~ Hardcover OUT OF PRINT.

$30.00


[Grant] Jean Edward Smith, GRANT . NEW copy. (NY: Simon & Schuster, 2001). 781 pages.
~~~ From Publisher's Weekly: Grant's reputation as a general has steadily improved in the past quarter century, and the preceding decade has seen reevaluation of a presidency previously dismissed as an eight-year disaster. Smith, until now best known for his work in 20th-century U.S. foreign policy (George Bush's War), integrates Grant's career and achievements in what is by far the best comprehensive biography to date of a man who remains in enigma. A West Pointer who disliked the army enough to resign from it in 1854, Grant failed unobtrusively at every civilian enterprise he attempted. His return to arms in 1861 was marked by no spectacular triumph. Instead, from Shiloh through Vickburgh to Chattanooga, he established himself as the North's best general by a combination of flexibility, resilience and determination. Lee's unconditional surrender was accompanied by Grant's de facto pardon of the defeated army, and Smith persuasively interprets this as an early turning point of reconstruction, preventing Northern reprisals that might have left the nation permanently divided emotionally. Elected president in 1868, Grant above all sought reconciliation, yet made measured and effective use of the army to protect black rights in the south. Smith makes a strong case that the financial scandals that dogged Grant's second term reflected individual misfeasance rather than structural malaise-Grant was better at judging military subordinates than political advisers. His mediation of the Hayes-Tilden election in 1876 helped avert a national crisis. As a conqueror who was also a healer of war's wounds, Grant stands with no superiors and few equals, Smith forcefully argues. (Apr.) Forecast: The timing of this book is right, with Colin Powell as secretary of state and an election whose questions of black disenfranchisement and small electoral margin of victory are analogous to Hayes-Tilden. Add to that this book's comprehensiveness, rigor and readability, and it should do quite well.

$35.00


Hyman, Harold M., UNION AND CONFIDENCE: THE 1860s. Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1976. VG. First Edition. Bound in glossy dark brown paper with gilt letter. In matching slipcase. Front hinge cracked on outside about one inch at bottom. Binding secure on inside. Book otherwise in very nice condition, as is slipcover. Line decorations, photographs, engravings, tables, page-end notes, index, 302 pages.

$45.00



Johnson, Mark W., THAT BODY OF BRAVE MEN: The U.S. Regular Infantry and the Civil War in the West. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (De Capo Press, 2003). 548 pages.
~~~ Two separate components made up the bulk of the Union Army: state volunteer regiments and the Regular Army. The volunteers have stood forefront in the mind of the American public, perhaps because the vast majority of Northern soldiers served in volunteer units. Much has been written about the volunteer units, but there has been very little attention paid to the 75,000 soldiers of the Union's Regular Army - until now. ~~~ The author covers in detail the history of the four Regular Army regiments that fought in the Civil War's Western Theater. Using old regimental records from the Civil War, as well as diaries and letters, the author has unearthed a wealth of new material about this long-neglected topic. He covers every unit and every battle in compelling narrative and exhaustive detail, and reaches some surprising conclusions about the significant role these troops played in the Union's eventual victory.
~~~ Currently in print at $45.

$40.00






Miller, Edward A., THE BLACK CIVIL WAR SOLDIERS OF ILLINOIS: The Story of the Twenty-Ninth U.S. Colored Infantry. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (University of South Carolina Press, 67 photographs, 267 pages.
~~~ Historian Edward A. Miller, Jr., chronicles the Civil War experience of a representative African American regiment--the 29th United States Colored Infantry. In a comprehensive examination of the unit's composition, contribution, and post-war fate, Miller demonstrates the value of the 29th as a means of understanding the Civil War experience of African American soldiers, including the prejudice that shaped their service.

$34.95


McKeever, General C., Quartermaster General of the U.S. Army, CIVIL WAR BATTLE FLAGS OF THE UNION ARMY AND ORDER OF BATTLE. NF/VG+. A few superficial flaws to jacket, which is in a mylar protector. Book otherwise in new condition. (NY: Knickerbocker Press, 1997). Photographs and tables printed on high-quality glossy paper throughout, 177 pages.
~~~ In 1887, Quartermaster General C. McKeever published a compilation of Union battle flags under the title Flags of the Army of the United States Carried During the War of the Rebellion 1861-1865. He also released an order of battle as Tabular Statements Showing the Names of Commanders of Army Corps, Divisions and Brigades, United States Army, During the War of 1861-1865, which charted the hierarchy of command for all the corps. This glorious reproduction compiles both guides into one volume. Includes the flags flown over the headquarters of Grant, Custer, and Sykes, as well as the flags for each corps, brigade, division, and army; along with "tabular statements" which detail the chain of command for every corps fighting on the Union side of the Civil War.

Originally published at $60, now OUT OF PRINT.

$65.00


Neely, Mark E. and Harold Holzer, UNION IMAGE: Popular Prints of the Civil War North. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (University of North Carolina Press, 1999). 296 pages.
~~~ This handsome, oversized volume with a scholarly but lively text, contributes to our understanding of life, politics and public opinion in the North, and is also an important contribution to the history of popular art in America . . . The Union Image captures the spirit of the time and evokes, at least in part, what it must have been like to live in the North during the war. The magic of this book, which belongs in the library of anyone interested in the Civil War, is that it helps remind one that it was not so long ago, and that the people who lived through it were not so different from us.
~~~ From Library Journal: "Neely and Holzer follow their previous Confederate Image: Prints of the Lost Cause (out of print) with a look at the uplifting propaganda prints of the North during and after the war. When the war opened with 4000 shells showering down on Fort Sumter in April 1861, not a single life was claimed, but the shelling shredded the American flag. The New York lithography firm of Currier & Ives immediately issued copies of "Bombardment of Fort Sumter" showing a soldier holding the tattered banner, which created a flag mania. Other companies soon joined in. Images of commanders nobly mounted, life in camp, tearful good-byes, lavish battle scenes showing Confederates in retreat, and dying soldiers with an angel hovering overhead were enthusiastically displayed in Northern homes to show patriotism. The 1864 Presidential campaign spawned more popular images. Over the years, the authors have scoured public and private collections to locate the 150 original prints represented here as well as new information on the artists and the printing processes. Their intent to recapture the spirit in which these prints were first published and their importance to American culture is successfully realized.

$49.95



Prokopowicz, Gerald J., ALL FOR THE REGIMENT: The Army of the Ohio, 1861-1862. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (University of North Carolina Press, 2001). 280 pages.
~~~ Despite its important role in the early years of the Civil War, the Army of the Ohio remains one of the least studied of all Union commands. With All for the Regiment, Gerald Prokopowicz deftly fills this gap. He offers an engaging history of the Army of the Ohio from its formation in 1861 to its costly triumph at Shiloh and its failure at Perryville in 1862. ~~~ All for the Regiment traces how the amateur soldiers who formed the Army of the Ohio bridged widely varying backgrounds to organize themselves into individual regiments of remarkable strength and cohesion. Successive commanders Robert Anderson, William T. Sherman, and Don Carlos Buell all failed to integrate those regiments into an effective organization, however. The result was a decentralized and elastic army that was easily disrupted and difficult to command -- but also nearly impossible to destroy in combat. ~~~ Exploring the army's behavior at minor engagements such as Rowlett's Station and Logan's Cross Roads, as well as major battles such as Shiloh and Perryville, Prokopowicz shows how its regiment- oriented culture prevented the army from experiencing decisive results -- either complete victory or catastrophic defeat -- on the battlefield. Regimental solidarity was at once the Army of the Ohio's greatest strength, he argues, and its most dangerous vulnerability. ~~~ More than a traditional campaign narrative, the book uses the Army of the Ohio's example to advance an innovative argument regarding battlefield performance in the Civil War. How an army fared in battle was primarily determined not by the skill of its commander or the technological sophistication of its weapons, Prokopowicz says, but by the way in which it was recruited and organized.
~~~ "An insightful and incisive analysis of Civil War military culture, of the disorganization of Civil War armies -— the key to their sloppy, indecisive, and deadly performances. This is an excellent anti-romance, original and unusual in approach and refreshingly honest." ~~Michael Fellman.
~~~ "This book fills an important niche in the history of Civil War armies. Lucid and lively, All for the Regiment shows how recruitment, training, and combat forged the bonds of comradeship that sustained morale and fighting power." ~~James M. McPherson
~~~ Currently in print at $37.50.

$35.00


Pullen, John J., A SHOWER OF STARS: The Medal of Honor and the 27th Maine. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket, Stackpole Books, 1997. Originally published in 1966; this edition contains new material. Photographs, notes, bibliography, index, 269 pages. "The story of a group of nine-month volunteers from York County who were issued 864 Medals of Honor, one for every member of the regiment. The hero of this story is Colonel Mark E. Wentworth, the commander of the 27th Maine, later of the 32nd Maine, who thwarted the forces that threatened ignominty on the Medal of Honor, and revealed the true character of valor." Hardcover OUT OF PRINT; softcover in print at $24.95.

$30.00



Silber, Nina, ed. YANKEE CORRESPONDENCE: Civil War Letters between New England Soldiers and the Home Front . Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1996. New in new dust jacket; blue boards; illustrations. 1st edition. "The letters in this book present a range of views from a variety of social and occupation strata on race, politics, and other matters and reveal the growing differences between New England and the rest of the country." From Booknews: " A collection of letters written by New England soldiers and their families, many published for the first time, grouped in six major themes: the military experience, the meaning of the war, views of the South, politics on the home front, the personal sacrifices of war, and finally, the correspondence of one particular family."

$30.00



Smith, W. Wayne, THE PRICE OF PATRIOTISM: Indiana County, Pennsylvania and the Civil War. NEW copy, though some light smudging to rear panel of dust jacket. (Burd Street Press, 1998). Photographs, maps, decorated end pages, notes, bibliography, index, 124 pages.

$25.00



(Strother) Cecil D. Eby, Jr. (ed), VIRGINIA YANKEE IN THE CIVIL WAR: The Diaries of David Hunter Strother. NEW copy, though some light smudging to rear panel of dust jacket. (Burd Street Press, 1998). Photographs, maps, decorated end pages, notes, bibliography, index, 124 pages.
~~~ The Civil War diaries of David Hunter Strother, known better to his contemporaries as "Porte Crayon," chronicle his three years of service in the Union army with the same cogency and eye for detail that made him one of the most popular writers and illustrators in America in his time. A Virginian strongly opposed to secession, Strother joined the Federal army as a civilian topographer in July of 1861 and was soon commissioned, rising eventually to the rank of brigadier general. He served under a succession of commanders, including Generals Patterson, Banks, Pope, and McClellan, winning their respect as well as their confidence. First published by UNC Press in 1961, A Virginia Yankee in the Civil War is a fascinating firsthand record of the conflict and of the divided loyalties it produced that is further enlivened by Strother's remarkable humor and insight.

$17.95


Weinert, Richard P. Jr., & Colonel Robert Arthur,. DEFENDER OF THE CHESAPEAKE: THE STORY OF FORT MONROE. White Mane Publishing Company, 1989. Fine/VG. 3rd Revised Edition. New copy, but some light smudging to dust jacket, which still has old $19.95 price. Currently in print at $25. Photographs, drawings, diagrams, decorated endpages, appendices, notes, bibliography, index, 361 pages. Covers history of Ft Monroe from its founding in 1823 through World War II, with particular emphasis on the Civil War.

$25.00



[Willcox] Robert Garth Scott (ed), FORGOTTEN VALOR: The Memoirs, Journals, and Civil War Letters of Orlando B. Willcox. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1999). 732 pages.
~~~ The papers of Major General Orlando Bolivar Willcox, one of the most prominent division commanders in the Union army, were recently discovered locked in a trunk in a Washington, D.C., attic, virtually untouched since his death nearly a century ago. Editor Robert Garth Scott has sifted through what is arguably the largest collection of Civil War-related material to surface in fifty years. From his childhood in Detroit through his cadetship at West Point, his service in the Mexican, Seminole, and Civil Wars, and his post-Civil War experiences in the West, Willcox’s story is published here for the first time.
~~~ Currently in print at $39.00.

$35.00



[Winters] Steven E. Woodworth (ed), THE MUSICK OF THE MOCKING BIRDS, THE ROAR OF THE CANNON: The Civil War Diary and Letters of William Winters. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. (University of Nebraska Press, 1998) 154 pages.
~~~ William Winters was unlike most of the young soldiers who answered the Union’s appeal for men in 1861 and 1862. He was different from many of his comrades in age and point of view, and his war service was also out of the ordinary. ~~~ The last great surge of popular voluntary enlistment swept up Winters, a thirty-two-year-old saddle and harness maker and father of three from Indiana. Like so many others in the Civil War, Winters was a prolific correspondent, and through his letters we have a record of some lesser-known campaigns. Winters served in the siege of Vicksburg and in the Red River Campaign, frequently as a nurse, a role that emphasized for him the darker side of the war. These letters and journal entries show a sensitive man who reflects upon both the loveliness of the southern locales in which he found himself and the hideousness of war.

$35.00







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