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Havighurst, Walter (editor & commentator), et al. LAND OF THE LONG HORIZONS. VG/VG. Some edgewear to jacket; creasing & edgewear to top of jacket spine. Jacket in mylar. Interior clean; binding tight. (NY: Coward-McCann Inc, 1960). First Edition. 8x11. Heavily illustrated throughout with engravings and b&w photographs. (Indiana University Press, 2007). 8.5x11. Illustrated. 437 pages.
~~~ Here are vivid selctions from the dramatic narratives of French missionaries and discoverers; the rough records of explorers and traders; the notes and journals of surveyors, river captains, timber cruisers, and frontier travelers; early newspaper stories of the young towns booming into cities; artless accounts of social pleasures and epic disasters; the writings of distinguished historieans; and outstanding interpretations of the region by Carl Sandburg, Zona Gale, Louis Bromfield, Sinclair Lewis, Glenway Wescott, Bruce Catton, and many others.

Carefully chosen for human interest and historic significance, and illuminated by over one hundred pictures, the eighty-two selections have been woven into a rich and meaningful whole by the introductions and running commentary of Walter Havighurst, himself one of the Midwest's finest writers and historians.

$35.00






Madison, James H. (ed). et al. HEARTLAND: Comparative Histories of the Midwestern States. VG+. Trade paperback. Some very light waterspotting to exterior page edges, otherwise a like-new copy, corners crisp, covers & interior bright. (NY: Coward-McCann Inc, 1960). First Edition. 6x9. Maps, chapter end-notes, contributors' notes, index, 308 pages.
~~~ To the cultural czars of the two coasts, America's heartland is frequently depicted as an amorphous, undifferentiated mass of land and people. Perhaps because the Midwest seems the most part of the United States.This volume is an attempt to examine the origins and nature of the unique Midwestern cultural phenomenon. Twelve experts examine individual states of the Midwest highlighting their singular features in seeking the 'personality' of each state. Each author, however, writes in a comparative context region bound together by commonalities of culture, much like the nation of which it is heartland.

$25.00






Sisson, Richard, et al. THE AMERICAN MIDWEST: An Interpretive Encyclopedia. NEW copy, hardcover. (Indiana University Press, 2007). 8.5x11. Illustrated. 1890 pages.
~~~ This expansive encyclopedia seeks to embrace the large and diverse area known as the American Midwest, giving it a voice and helping to define its complex, yet distinctive character. In addition to detailed entries on everything from the Rust Belt to the Civil Rights Movement, it presents portraits of the region's twelve states, their geography, and their people.\

$75.00













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Argersinger, Peter H., THE LIMITS OF AGRARIAN RADICALISM: WESTERN POPULISM & AMERICAN POLITICS.. University Press of Kansas., NEW, still in shrinkwrap. Essays. 312 pp.

$30.00


Parker, Tony, BIRD, KANSAS. Knopf, 1989., F/F, like new. 1st American edition. 327 pp. "You won't find Bird in no guidebooks--but then you find Kansas either, least not in some guidebooks I've seen. That don't stop it being a neat little place to live & die in though." (Lester Gover, Mayor) .

$20.00













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Bien, Laura. TALES FROM THE YPSILANTI ARCHIVES: Tripe-Mongers, Parker's Hair Balsam, The Underwear Club & More. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Charleston: The History Press, 2010). 6x9. Over 50 images. 160 pages.

~~~ Author Laura Bien offers up a diverse sampling of offbeat and lighthearted stories that will transplant readers to the bygone days of Ypsilanti—from the fight Ypsilanti waged against standardized time to the gloom apparent in a Ypsilantian’s Depression-era grocery receipt, and from Jackson’s glowing pork chop to the time Ypsilantians staunchly defended themselves against accusations of “sloppy speech.” Join Bien to enjoy these quirky tales and learn what life used to be like in this fascinating city.

$20.00



Dorson, Richard M., BLOODSTOPPERS & BEARWALKERS: FOLK TRADITIONS OF THE UPPER PENINSULA. VG/VG. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard, 1952. First Edition. No obvious flaws to book. Some chipping to jacket. Jacket in mylar protector. Jacket price-clipped. Illustrated with photographs. Extensive notes. Index, 305 pages.

$40.00



Shiel, Lisa A. FORGOTTEN TALES OF MICHIGAN'S UPPER PENINSULA. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Charleston: The History Press, 2010). 5x7. Over 15 images. 176 pages.

~~~ “That’s the best I’ve ever seen you look,” the barber said to the corpse. What kind of filthy decedent could inspire such derision? Learn the answer and read myriad other little-known tales from Michigan’s northernmost region in Forgotten Tales of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Find out what happened after an aggrieved husband aimed a gun at his wife’s lover and then asked the crowd, “Shall I shoot him?” Meet the sleeping man who rode the rails without a train. Discover the truth behind the rumors that one mining town was cursed with the ten plagues of Egypt, and learn why hugs terrified an entire city. And what were those hairy, bipedal beasts haunting the woods? Join Yooper Lisa Shiel as she brings to the fore these wonderfully offbeat and all-but-forgotten tales from the UP’s history.

$13.00



Warnes, Kathy Covert. ECORSE, MICHIGAN: A Brief History. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Charleston: The History Press, 2009). 6x9. Over 85 images. 160 pages.

~~~ Ecorse, the oldest downriver community, was the site of many critical battles from the French and Indian War through the War of 1812 as French and English settlers forged new homes in the Michigan wilderness. By 1827, the scattering of settlers had developed into a small community, and the township of Ecorse was formed. During the Prohibition era, the peaceful riverfront was transformed into hideouts for rumrunners and other nefarious lawbreakers. From a prosperous shipbuilding industry to a championship rowing club and the Detroit River runs made by the Bob-Lo boats, Ecorse’s maritime history is one that continues to engage residents and impel the community forward.

$20.00












Klinkenborg, Verlyn, MAKING HAY. Nick Lyons Books, 1986., NF/VG. Front upper right corner of DJ sunbleached: design & lettering unaffected. Original price of "$14.95" intact. In thin mylar protector. Illustrated by Gordon Allen. Notes. 157 pp. "The rural midwesterners and westerners in this book are warmly and intelligently and humorously depicted, warts and all, in language that often approaches poetry in its lilt and freshness. While MAKING HAY may be about making hay, the quality of its writing makes it literature." (--John Graves). Author' s first book. SIGNED BY AUTHOR.

$50.00












Nagel, Paul C. MISSOURI: A Bicenntenial History. VG/VG, hardcover with dust jacket. Jacket price-clipped, flaps creased; covers & spine clean. Remainder mark on bottom edge of book. Book generally clean & bright. (NY: WW Norton, 1977). First Edition. B&W photos, index, 205 pages.
~~~ Missourians could hardly have made a more appropriate decision than to name their capital after Thomas Jefferson. A meeting place of major rivers, Missouri became a gateway to the beckoning West opened up to Americans by Jefferson's Louisiana Purchase. In the era of overland traders and steamboat pilots, of Thomas Hart Benton and Mark Twain, life in Missouri was strongly flavored by the Jeffersonian spirit--expressed in a suspicion of large cities, a belief that mankind flourished best in a rural setting, a faith in the free individual as the guardian of liberty, and a steady insistence that the powers granted to government must be limited.
~~~ The Civil War and the century that followed it brought Missouri a time of tribulation. Machines mastered nature, and new forces prepared the way for a society of giant cities, business goliaths, and expanding government. Skeptical Missourians nonetheless challenged Americans to rediscover their heritage, and into the era of Harry Truman they stood fast by their "Show Me" attitude, questioning much of what passed for progress in the fast-changing nation.
~~~ Missouri is still profoundly shaped by its cherished Jeffersonian legacy, Nagel argues. St. Louis and Kansas City, major metropolitan areas on the east and the west, vie for power with the state's rural areas in a continuing struggle between city and country.
~~~ First published in 1977 as part of the Norton bicentennial series on The States and the Nation, a project of the American Association for State and Local History.

$25.00

















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Hanna, Robert, A NEBRASKA PORTFOLIO. University of Nebraska Press., New, unopened. First edition. 9.25"x 8.75" oblong. 155 full-page b&w and color drawings and watercolors. Preface by the artist. "For eighteen months Robert Hanna put his architectural career aside to drive his faithful Dodge Aspen back & forth acros s Nebraska. He logged fifteen thousand miles through all seasons & weather. He ducked tornadoes & braved snowstorms to draw barns, bridges, depots, mills, storefronts, mansions, courthouses, churches, theaters, bandstands, ballparks, & other monuments to the human proclivity for building." Everything from opera houses to treehouses. $30.00

$15.00















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Brown, Harriet Connor, GRANDMOTHER BROWN'S HUNDRED YEARS 1827-1927.. Little, Brown & Company, 1930., VG. A tight, clean copy. Green, cloth-covered boards. Woodcuts & photographs, 369 pp. The biography of a midwestern woman, Maria Brown, born in Athens, Ohio in 1827, who married and moved to Iowa in 1856. Includes a chapter-long account of Maria's parents who were among the first wave of settlers, many of whom were Revolutionary War veterans, who first cleared that section of the Northwest Territory in the 1780s. In recounting Maria Brown's life, her grand-daughter, Harriet Brown, provides innumerable details of farm and small town life as it existed in nineteenth-century Ohio and Iowa. $35.00

$35.00




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Turzillo, Jane Ann. WICKED WOMEN OF NORTHEAST OHIO. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Charleston: The History Press, 2011). 6x9. Over 25 images. 112 pages.

~~~ In Wicked Women of Northeast Ohio, author Jane Ann Turzillo recounts the misdeeds of ten dark-hearted women who refused to play by the rules. They unleashed their most base impulses using axes, guns, poison and more. You’ll meet Perry’s Velma West, a mere slip of a girl who was unfortunately too near a hammer during an argument. New Philadelphia’s Ellen Athey—no lady herself—had a similar problem with an axe. Ardell Quinn, who operated the longest-running brothel in Cleveland, would simply argue that she was a good businesswoman. Grim? Often. Entertaining? Deliciously so.

$20.00





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