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A LISTING OF TRACEABLE MARINE CAMPAIGNS: The Civil War to the Cuban Pacification Campaigns.



$30.00




Brooke, George , JOHN M. BROOKE, NAVAL SCIENTIST AND EDUCATOR.

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$35.00

Campbell, R. Thomas, SOUTHERN FIRE: Southern Fire: Exploits of the Confederate States Navy. NF/VG. A new copy, but with a crease to top of jacket spine and several small tears to jacket. White Maine Publishing Co., 1996. Liberally illustrated throughout, appendices, bibliography, notes, index, 263 pages.

$25.00

(Dahlgren), Schneller, Robert J. Jr., A QUEST FOR GLORY: A BIOGRAPHY OF REAR ADMIRAL JOHN A. DAHLGREN.



$35.00


deKay, James Tertius, THE REBEL RAIDERS: The Astonishing History of the Conferacy's Secret Navy. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (NY: Ballantine/Random House, 2002). First Edition. Maps, illustrations, bibliography, 257 pages.
~~~ During its clandestine construction in Liverpool, it was known as "Number 290." When it was finally unleashed as the CSS Alabama, the Confederate gunship triggered the last great military campaign of the Civil War; a maritime adventure unparalleled in our history; an infamous example of British political treachery; and the largest retribution settlement ever negotiated by an international tribunal: $15,500,000 in gold paid by Britain to the United States. This riveting true story of the Anglo-Confederate alliance that led to the creation of a Southern navy illuminates the dramatic and crucial global impact of the American Civil War. ~~~ Like most things in the War between the States, it started over cotton: Lincoln's naval blockade prevented the South from exporting their prize commodity to England. In response, the Confederacy came up with a unique plan to divert the North's vessels and open the waterways -– a plan that would mean covertly building a navy in Britain, a daring strategy that involved an unforgettable cast of colorful characters. ~~~ James Bulloch -– Northerner by circumstance, Southerner by birth -- risked his life to enter England and build a fleet under the very noses of Northern spies; Lord John Russell -– the British foreign secretary who was suspected of subverting his own legal system to allow the secret ships; Charles Francis Adams -– son and grandson of presidents, who exhausted every avenue to stop the Confederate-British collusion; Raphael Semmes -– the fanatically loyal Southern captain who disabled or destroyed sixty Northern ships before meeting his match near Cherbourg, France; and the Alabama -– a wooden gunshipthat took to the sea named for a Southern state to wreak havoc on the Northern cause. ~~~ With The Rebel Raiders, naval historian James Tertius deKay brings to dazzling life an amazing, little known piece of history that is at once an important work of Civil War scholarship and a suspenseful tale of military strategy, international espionage, and a legal crisis whose outcome still affects the world.
~~~ Hardcover OUT OF PRINT. Paperback currently in print at $13.95.

$26.00

Donnelly, Ralph W. and David M. Sullivan, BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES of the COMMISSIONED OFFICERS of the CONFEDERATE STATES MARINE CORPS

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$30.00

Hearn, Chester G., ELLET'S BRIGADE: The Strangest Outfit of the Them All.



$34.50




(Lamson), McPherson, James M. and Patricia R. McPherson, LAMSON OF THE GETTYSBURG: The Civil War Letters of Lieutenant Roswell H. Lamson, U.S. Navy. First Edition. NEW copy. Oxford University Press, 1997.

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$22.50



Livingston, Mary P. A CIVIL WAR MARINE AT SEA



$35.00



(Mallory), Durkin, Joseph T., CONFEDERATE NAVY CHIEF: STEPHEN R. MALLORY, Columbia, S.C.: University of South Carolina Press, 1987. Reprint of the 1954 edition.

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$35.00












Mariners' Museum, MONITOR CHRONICLES: One Sailor's Account ~~ Today's Campaign to Recover the Civil War Wreck. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. (Simon & Schuster, 2000). 272 pages.
~~~ From Kirkus Reviews: "During the Civil War, some 172 feet of seagoing iron, with a deck a mere foot-and-a-half above the water line, made the world's navies instantly obsolete. That's maritime history, retold here. The human story, too, is told by one of the ship's crewmen. The Monitor, the Union's "cheesebox on a raft," was the brainchild of the brilliant, feisty John Ericsson. It changed naval warfare forever, and it changed the lives of its sailors. Civil War historian Marvel's (Burnside, 1991) text is composed largely of letters from the Monitor's fireman George Geer to his wife in New York. They date from the time Geer boarded the newly commissioned warship in January 1862 through its foundering in rough seas the last day of the same year. Within weeks of her launching, the Monitor engaged in its historic duel with the Confederate Merrimack (rechristened the Virginia), which withdrew. Each ship's guns were unable to penetrate the other's armor. Marvel's exposition is clear and succinct, as are Geer's letters, in beautiful penmanship and atrocious spelling. Though his depictions of events occasionally tend to be wrong (elevating routine siege fire to major battles and exaggerating casualties), his narrative of the heat and fumes, the crew's bad food, and the scourge of Confederate sharpshooters on shore is remarkably interesting, with a mordant wit often evident. His occasional dispirit, his money worries, his efforts to gain a promotion, and his regular husbandly assurances of his well-being (especially after his survival of the sinking of his ship) attest to the conflict's human concerns. We learn nothing of Geer's postwar life, and Mrs.Geer's letters did not survive (although it is interesting to note that the mails went through with more dispatch then than they seem to today). A final chapter deals with continuing efforts to recover the wreck of the historic ship. A unique history, unusually accessible because it is taken largely from the pen of a long-dead sailor. No prior knowledge of maritime practice or Civil War arcana necessary."

$35.00




Smith, Gene A., IRON AND HEAVY GUNS: Duel Between the Monitor and Merrimac . (Abilene: McWhiney, 1998). VG+. TRADE PAPERBACK. First Edition.
~~~ March 1862. The Union ironclad warship, Monitor, with its two eleven-inch Dahlgren smoothbores in a unique revolving turret assembly, leaves New York City under tow to serve blockade duty off the coast of North Carolina. Meanwhile, the Confederate ironclad Virginia (formerly the wooden frigate Merrimac) is raising havoc with Union blockaders in Hampton Roads. The inevitable showdown takes place on March 9. For more than four hours the two ironclads battle furiously at close range. The Merrimac finally withdraws and returns to Norfolk to protect the river approaches to Richmond, leaving the Monitor in control of the Roads and in position to protect the Union blockaders. In May, the Merrimac is destroyed by its own crew to prevent capture; in December, the Monitor sinks in a storm off Cape Hatteras while under tow from Hampton Roads to North Carolina waters. An exciting account of two ships that would change naval warfare forever."

$11.50




Morgan, James Morris (edited by R. Thomas Campbell), MIDSHIPMAN IN GRAY: Selections from Recollections of a Rebel Reefer. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Shippensburg, PA: Burd Street Press, 1997). Illustrations, introduction & epilogue by the editor, chronology, notes, index, 220 pages.
~~~ Midshipman in Gray makes available to the modern reader the first twenty-eight chapters of James Morris Morgan's book, Recollections of a Rebel Reefer. Morgan was involved in many exploits during the War Between the States, and his book is an intriguing and sometimes humorous look at a young midshipman's exciting adventures in the Confederate States Navy.
~~~~ Briefly recounting his early childhood days while growing up on the sprawling plantations of Louisiana, Morgan quickly comes to the most important years of his life, the War Between the States.
~~~~ Assigned to the gunboat CSS McRae during the early fighting on the Mississippi, the young midshipman was on that vessel during the fierce battle for New Orleans in April of 1862. Later, Morgan sailed to Europe on special duty, where he was assigned to the cruiser CSS Georgia.
~~~~ After recounting his many harrowing tales of adventures on the high seas, Morgan returns to the Confederacy and is posted to the Confederate States Naval Academy. Upon graduating he is detailed to accompany President Davis and his family as they flee southward at the end of the war. Edited and annotated by Tom Campbell, Morgan's exploits paint a vivid and exciting portrait of life as a midshipman in the Confederate States Navy.
~~~~ Midshipman in Gray combines a significant firsthand account with Campbell's widely recognized scholarship to give flesh and blood to this new way of looking at naval life.
~~~ This edition published at $24.95, but now OUT OF PRINT.

$25.00


Parker, Jones, Evans & Lee, THE SOUTH AFTER THE WAR AND THE CONFEDERATE NAVY. Blue & Gray Press.,

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$30.00



Porter, Admiral, INCIDENTS AND ANECDOTES OF THE CIVIL WAR. NEW copy. (Harrisburg, PA: Archive Society, 1997). Facsimile reprint of original 1885 D. Appleton edition. Finely bound in blue leatherette with stamped decorations, gilt inlays and gilt edges. Marbled endpages. Sewn binding. Steel engraving frontispiece, 357 pages.
~~~ This edition OUT OF PRINT.

$65.00




Poyer, David, , COUNTRY OF OUR OWN: A Novel of the Civil War at Sea. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. LARGE PRINT. (NY: Simon & Schuster, 2003). 429 pages.
~~~ From Kirkus Reviews: "Volume two of Poyer's ambitious trilogy about the Civil War at sea. In Fire on the Waters (2001), US Navy Lieutenant Ker Claiborne, Annapolis graduate and the very model of a career officer, faced the most painful decision of his young life -- the need to make an irrevocable choice, the same one confronting other ardent Virginians -- Robert E. Lee, for instance. As this sequel gets underway, it's clear that Claiborne and Lee have cast their lots similarly: They've resigned their US commissions and signed on with the secessionists, Ker now a lieutenant in the infant Confederate navy. Among his fellow Southrons, however, there are those who simply don't trust him, who see cowardice and self-seeking in a decision too long delayed. Fire-breathing Mississippian, Henry Minter -- like Ker, an Annapolis graduate and CSA naval lieutenant -- challenges Ker to a duel, interdicted at the climactic moment by Navy brass (good men are nonexpendable). Soon thereafter, Ker finds himself reporting for duty as first officer aboard the CSS Montgomery, an old paddle-wheeler skippered by longtime friend Captain Parker Trezivant. Their charge: to undertake a watery version of Sherman's march: that is, to torch as much of the North's maritime trade as possible, and, by burning ships and destroying cargo, make the war increasingly unattractive to Yankee business interests. Ker, an apt pupil, learns from Captain Trezivant and later succeeds him when the latter's luck runs out. As a marauder, Ker performs brilliantly, even infamously, infuriating the enemy and earning the accolade of having a price put on his head. But his domestic life is complex. There are a son and a wife home in Richmond, terribly missed. And there's alsoa shipmate, a fierce and intransigent warrior woman, whom he's unwillingly drawn to. Will receive -- and deserves -- a warm welcome from the C.S. Forester/Patrick O'Brian audience."

$25.00



Pullen, John J., IRONCLAD CAPTAIN: Seth Ledyard Phelps and the U.S. Navy, 1841-1864 . NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket, still in shrinkwrap. Kent Ohio: Kent State University Press, 1996. Forward by Edwin C. Bearss. 449 pages. "Seth Ledyard Phelps was of the Old Navy and the New. As a midshipman and junior officer he served under sail off West Africa, in the War with Mexico, and in the Mediterranean and Caribbean. As a senior officer in the river squadrons of the Civil War he saw combat at its closest. Phelps, a native of Chardon, Ohio, was a prolific and observant correspondent. His private letters, to his wife, his father, and to political patrons and other naval officers, are among the most compelling and descriptive extant. The heart of Ironclad Captain are these letters, which Jay Slagle has set in context through the judicious use of published documents, memoirs, and scholarly histories of the navy. The result is a small history of the navy and its officer corps for the middle third of the nineteenth century." From Booknews: "Slagle, great-great grandson of Seth Ledyard Phelps, provides a history of the navy during the middle of the 19th century based primarily on the captain's abundant correspondence and placed in context through the use of published documents, memoirs, and scholarly histories of the navy. B&w illustrations."

$30.00


[Read] R. Thomas Campbell, SEA HAWK OF THE CONFEDERACY: Lt. Charles W. Read and the confederate Navy. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Shippensburg, PA: Burd Street Press, 2000). Maps, illustrations, appendices, notes, bibliography, index, 236 pages.
~~~ "Thomas Campbell's latest addition to his several other books on the Confederate Navy is the most exciting, as an 'old, mostly unknown' hero emerges to the spotlight he so well deserves. This first, complete biography of Lt. Charles W. Read, CSN, skillfully weaves various obscure sources of information, mostly unknown except to serious students of the Confederate Navy, to new family histories recently discovered. Many of the generous number of photographs have never been seen in public before. Read's participation on such ships as the CSS McRAE, ARKANSAS, FLORIDA AND WEBB are but a portion of the many thrilling experiences he originated and encountered. A brief history of each of the ships such as with Capt. Maffitt on the CSS FLORIDA fills the reader with anticipation of the next chase and adventure. Charles Read's overland escapades will surprise many students of the army to find they were done by navy personnel. In short, this book is a must for anyone who wants to learn of a true life adventurer and to ask themselves 'why haven't we heard of him before?'. Thomas Campbell is to be commended for this work." ~~~ John E. Ellis, founder, Confederate Navy Research Center, Mobile, Alabama,

$29.95

[Read] David W. Shaw, SEA WOLF OF THE CONFEDERACY: The Daring Civil War Raids of Naval Lt. Charles W. Read. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (NY: Free Press, 2004). Maps, illustrations, bibliography, index, 235 pages.
~~~ In June 1863, just days before the epic clash at Gettysburg ended the last rebel land invasion of the North, a small party of the Confederate Navy mounted a devastating series of raids on the New England coast, culminating in a battle off Portland, Maine. Veteran author David W. Shaw brilliantly re-creates this almost forgotten chapter of the Civil War in rich narrative detail drawn from accounts of the participants. At the center of the conflict were two men: the hotheaded young adventurer Charles W. Read, who resigned his commission as a Union midshipman to become a lieutenant in the Confederate Navy; and Secretary of the United States Navy Gideon Welles, a well-connected politician who ably oversaw the explosive growth of the fleet - including the revolutionary ironclads - during the war despite his lack of maritime experience. Serving aboard CSS Florida off the coast of Brazil, Read hatched a daring plan to sail a captured brig directly into the Union's home waters and wreak havoc on their shipping lanes. Burning or capturing more than twenty merchant vessels in less then three weeks, and switching ships several times to elude capture, Read's rampage caused widespread panic in Northern cities, made headlines in the major daily newspapers, and brought enormous pressure on Welles to 'stop the rebel pirate.' At one point there were nearly forty Union ships sent to hunt down Read in a cat-and-mouse game that finally led to his dramatic capture off the coast of Maine.
~~~ From Library Journal: "Shaw, a journalist who has written several books on 19th-century history, presents the story of naval raider Charles Read (1850-90). Read, an Annapolis graduate, resigned his commission to join the rebel cause. When, in July 1863, the Confederate navy developed its bold plan to attack merchant ships along the New England coast, Read successfully drove the blockade runner Tacony up the Chesapeake Bay and destroyed 24 Union vessels. The attacks drew outrage in the North and the ire of Lincoln's secretary of the navy, Gideon Welles. Read was eventually captured and returned to the South in a prisoner exchange. This lively account can be compared to R. Thomas Campbell's Fire and Thunder: Exploits of the Confederate States Navy and Spencer Tucker's Raphael Semmes and the Alabama. Shaw's bibliography includes primary and secondary materials but fails to provide footnotes, making it difficult to determine the sources for exact quotes and general information. However, this gripping tale would be a welcome addition to public libraries for Civil War enthusiasts."

$25.00


Selfridge, Thomas O., Jr., WHAT FINER TRADITION: The Memoirs of T.O. Selfridge, Jr, Rear Admiral, USN. University of South Carolina Press, 1987.

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$30.00

Silverstone, Paul H., CIVIL WAR NAVIES: 1855-1883.



$49.00



Smith, C. Carter, Jr., TWO NAVAL JOURNALS: 1864. The journal of a Confederate sailor aboard the CSS Tennessee and the journal of a U.S. Marine aboard the USS Hartford.



$15.00


Sullivan, David M., THE UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS IN THE CIVIL WAR: The First Year. NEW copy, hardcover in dust jacket. (Shippensburg, PA: White Mane Publishing Company, 1997). First Edition. Photographs, maps, period etchings, tables, extensive notes, bibliography, index, 350 pages.
~~~ David Sullivan's magisterial history of the United States Marine Corps during the Civil War dispels the notion that the organization did little or nothing to sustain its reputation during the conflict. He debunks the myth that the Marine Battalion broke at the first attack during the Battle of Bull Run and remained in the rear for the rest of the fight. The author presents evidence that naval officers, charged with securing advanced bases along the coast of the Confederacy, were eager to have the participation of Marines in those operations. The book also brings to light the contributions of Marines to the many small unit actions necessary to cripple the confederate war effort, and reveals the courage of the Marines who fought at Fort Sumter, Hampton Roads, and Tulifinney Crossroads. Lavishly illustrated with 170 pictures in the first book alone, over half of which have never been published before, and based upon letters and journals of Marines, this book places the Corps in its proper place among the forces of the United States in the Civil War.


$40.00


Sullivan, David M., THE UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS IN THE CIVIL WAR: The Second Year. NEW copy, hardcover in dust jacket. (Shippensburg, PA: White Mane Publishing Company, 1997). First Edition. Photographs, maps, period etchings, tables, extensive notes, bibliography, index, 373 pages.
~~~ In this second of David Sullivan’s magisterial series on the history of the United States Marines, the Marines come into direct battle with the Confederate States Marines at Drewry’s Bluff, May 15, 1862. There Corporal John Mackie earned the first Medal of Honor awarded to an enlisted United States Marine. In this second year of the war, the Marines fought everywhere the Navy did, especially in the Union’s year-long struggle to gain control of the Mississippi River and Confederacy’s coasts. Bringing the personalities of the Corps to life, Sullivan includes such episodes as when Captain John L. Broome’s two hundred Marines occupied New Orleans briefly until the Army relieved him. Sullivan, continuing in the tradition of his first work, also shows the everyday life of the Leathernecks at sea and on shore. During 1862, the United States Marine Band began its rise to reeminence. The author also uses his immense research into unpublished sources concerning Lieutenant Colonel John G. Reynolds’ court-martial to end the legend than an internecine struggle within the Corps’ senior ranks was responsible for the Corps not taking an even more active role in the Civil War.

$40.00


Sullivan, David M., THE UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS IN THE CIVIL WAR: The Third Year. NEW copy, hardcover in dust jacket. (Shippensburg, PA: White Mane Publishing Company, 1998). First Edition. Photographs, maps, period etchings, tables, extensive notes, bibliography, index, 361 pages.
~~~ On land and water, in the North, the South, and in foreign seas, the United States Marines expanded their service in the third year of the Civil War. In the South, Marines joined in the ill-fated attempts of September 1863 to recapture Fort Sumter, and in May 1864 the Red River expedition on the other side of the Confederacy. But the Corps’ work in the ongoing coastal war yielded success, as that duty continued. David Sullivan weaves the foreign duty of the Marines of the Pacific and East India Squadrons into his story, including their role in the first confrontation between United States and Japanese naval forces at the Battle of Shimonoseki Straits. He also documents the hitherto unrecognized service of the Marines in the sinking of the C.S.S. Alabama and the capture of the C.S.S. Florida. At home, Marines battled the mobs in the July 1863 New York draft riots. In November, the United States Marine Band performed at the dedication ceremonies where President Abraham Lincoln delivered his Gettysburg Address. Including eyewitness accounts, Sullivan also shows how the Marine Corps’ internal administration was nearly overwhelmed by the misinterpretation of the 1861 law governing enlistment bounties. The system of justice that prevailed in the Marine Corps during the Civil War years is explored, using period accounts and court-martial records."


$40.00


Thomsen, Brian M. (ed), BLUE & GRAY AT SEA: Naval Memoirs of the Civil War..



$25.00


(Wood), Shingleton, Royce Gordon, JOHN TAYLOR WOOD: Sea Ghost of the Confederacy. Athens, Georgia.: University of Georgia Press., 1979.

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$30.00



North
South
Naval
Campaigns
Unit
Histories
General
Histories
Misc.