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click to enlarge Pengelly, Colin. ALBERT BALL VC: The Fighter Pilot Hero of World War I. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Pen & Sword, 2010). 6x9, 53 mono in plate sections, 208 pages.

~~~ Albert Ball’s individuality and his insistence on fighting alone set him apart from other fighter pilots during World War One. His invincible courage and utter determination made him a legend not only in Britain but also amongst his enemies, to whom the sight of his lone Nieuport Scout brought fear. In 1914 he enlisted in the British army with the 2/7th Battalion (Robin Hoods), of the Sherwood Foresters, Notts and Derby Regiment. By the October of 1914 he had reached the rank of Sergeant and then in the same month was made a Second-Lieutenant to his own battalion. In June 1915 he paid for private tuition and trained as a pilot at Hendon. In October 1915 he obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate and requested transfer to the Royal Flying Corps. The transfer granted, he further trained at Norwich and Upavon, being awarded the pilot's brevet on 22 January 1916. On 16 May 1916 - flying Bristol Scout 5512 - he opened his score, shooting down an Albatros C-type over Beaumont. On 29 May 1916 he shot down two LVG C-types, whilst flying his Nieuport 5173.
~~~ Captain Albert Ball made his final flight on 7 May 1917 when he flew SE5 A4850 as part of an eleven-strong hunting patrol into action against Jagdstaffel 11, led by Lothar Von Richthofen. It was a very cloudy day. Albert was pursuing Lothar's Albatros Scout who crash-landed, wounded. Then Albert was seen by many observers to dive out of a cloud and crash. He died minutes later in the arms of a French girl, Madame Cecille Deloffre. He rose from obscurity to the top rank of contemporary fighter pilots in only 15 months. In that period he had been awarded the MC, DSO and two Bars and was credited with at least 44 victories. He was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

$39.95






Bowyer, Chaz ROYAL FLYING CORPS COMMUNIQUES 1917-1918.

$50.00



click to enlarge Franks, Norman, BRITISH AND AMERICAN ACES OF WORLD WAR I: The Pictorial Record. NEW copy, hardcover. 8.5x11. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing). Over 400 b&w photographs, 240 pages.
~~~ A companion volume to German Aces of World War I - The Pictorial Record (Norman Franks & Greg VanWyngarden, Schiffer, 2004), this new book covers the British and Commonwealth fighter aces of the Great War. One chapter covers the aces with ten or more victories, and an additional chapter lists the fighter aces with nine down to five victories, giving their squadrons, where they hailed from, and in many cases their subsequent fate. For the American aces, the author lists every fighter ace of the period, from Rickenbacker’s twenty-six down to those with five victories.


$59.95



click to enlarge Goodall, Mike, BRITISH AIRCRAFT BEFORE THE GREAT WAR. NEW copy, hardcover issued without dustjacket, laminated pictorial boards. 8.5x11. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 2001). Over 930 b&w photographs, 300 pages.
~~~ For the very first time, the history of British pre-World War I aircraft has been gathered together in one volume, with more than 900 of them well illustrated. This new book constitutes a most valuable contribution about a remarkable period in aviation history and is a memorial to the bravery and inventiveness of the intrepid pioneers of that far off era. Among the many famous manufacturer's covered are Avro, Sopwith, Shorts, and Bristol. Many lesser known designers and builders such as Martin-Handasyde and Howard Wright are also given ample coverage.


$59.95



Hart, Peter, BLOODY APRIL: Slaughter in the Skies over Arras, 1917 . NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Orion Publishing, 2005). Illustrated. 384 pages.

~~~ As the Allies embarked upon the Battle of Arras, they desperately needed air support from the Royal Flying Corps. But by this point the RFC were flying obsolete planes. The new German Albatros scouts massively outclassed them in every respect: speed, armament, ability to withstand punishment and maneuverability.
~~~ Many of the RFC's pilots were straight out of flying school - as they took to the air they were sitting targets for the experienced German aces. Over the course of 'Bloody April' the RFC suffered casualties of over a third.
~~~ The average life expectancy of a new subaltern on the front line dropped to just eleven days. And yet they carried on flying, day after day, in the knowledge that, in the eyes of their commanders at least, their own lives meant nothing compared to the tens of thousands of soldiers on the ground who were being lost daily.
~~~ In this book Peter Hart tells the story of the air war over Arras, using the voices of the men who were actually there. His research has uncovered a vast amount of previously unpublished information, some of which is controversial: for example, were some of the British aces being completely truthful about their fabulous victories?
~~~ Currently in print at $32.95.

$30.00











click to enlarge Hawker, Tyrrel M, MC. HAWKER VC -- THE FIRST RFC ACE: The Life of Major Lanoe Hawker VC DSO, 1890-1916. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Pen & Sword, 2013). 6x9, 16 pages of b&w plates, 256 pages.

~~~ The brother of Lanoe Hawker VC DSO as a tribute wrote this fascinating book. The Hawkers came from a distinguished sporting family with strong military and naval records and Lanoe from the outset set his sights on flying for the RFC. After the Central Flying School he crossed to France in October 1914 with 6 Squadron equipped with BE2s and Henri Farmans. As the war in the air progressed so Hawker came more and more into his own both as a combat pilot and commander. He was rapidly promoted and given command of 24 Squadron. He, like other pilots, flew numerous machines such as Bristol Scouts, FE4227s and the famous DH2s.
~~~ This book contains many combat reports by pilots of their missions and these make the most graphic reading. The relative merits, qualities and characteristics of the aircraft both British, French and German are discussed with pilots’ opinions.
~~~ For a better insight into combat air operations Hawker VC – The First RFC Ace is unlikely to be surpassed, thanks to the extensive use of first-hand accounts. Casualty/death rates were appalling but this special band of brothers flew on regardless until their turn came

$39.95






click to enlarge Lee, Arthur Gould. NO PARACHUTE: A Classic Account of War in the Air in World War I. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Grub Street Publishing, 2013). 5.25x8.25, photographs, 256 pages.

~~~ From the young airmen who took their frail machines high above the trenches of World War I and fought their foes in single combat there emerged a renowned company of brilliant aces – among them Ball, Bishop, McCudden, Collishaw and Mannock – whose legendary feats have echoed down half a century. But behind the elite there were, in the Royal Flying Corps, many hundreds of other airmen who flew their hazardous daily sorties in outdated planes without ever achieving fame. Here is the story of one of these unknown flyers – a story based on letters written on the day, hot on the event, which tells of a young pilot’s progress from fledgling to seasoned fighter. His descriptions of air fighting, sometimes against the Richtofen Circus, of breathless dogfights between Sopwith Pup and Albatros, are among the most vivid and immediate to come out of World War I. Gould Lee brilliantly conveys the immediacy of air war, the thrills and the terror, in this honest and timeless account. Rising to the rank of air vice-marshal, Gould Lee never forgot the RFC’s needless sacrifices – and in a trio of trenchant appendices he examines, with the mature judgment of a senior officer of the RAF and a graduate of the Staff and Imperial Defense Colleges, the failure of the Army High Command to provide both efficient airplanes until mid-1917 and parachutes throughout the war, and General Trenchard’s persistence in a costly and largely ineffective conception of the air offensive.

$26.95





click to enlarge Lewis, Cecil. SAGITTARIUS RISING. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Frontline Books, 2008). 5.5x8.5, 344 pages.

~~~ 'Classic . . . the definitive account of aerial combat – full of passion and poetry’ – Max Arthur, Independent.
~~~ ‘Magical evocation of the lonely battle fought in the clouds’ – The Daily Telegraph.
~~~ ‘This is a book everyone should read. It is the autobiography of an ace, and no common ace either. The boy had all the noble tastes and qualities, love of beauty, soaring imagination, a brilliant endowment of good looks . . . this prince of pilots . . . had a charmed life in every sense of the word’ – George Bernard Shaw

~~~ Sent to France with the Royal Flying Corps at just seventeen, and later a member of the famous 56 Squadron, Cecil Lewis was an illustrious and passionate fighter pilot of the First World War, described by Bernard Shaw in 1935 as 'a thinker, a master of words, and a bit of a poet'.
~~~ In this vivid and spirited account the author evocatively sets his love of the skies and flying against his bitter experience of the horrors of war, as we follow his progress from France and the battlefields of the Somme, to his pioneering defense of London against deadly night time raids.

$30.00




click to enlarge Malinovska, Anna and Mauriel Joslyn. VOICES IN FLIGHT: Conversations with Air Veterans of the Great War. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Pen & Sword, 2006). 9.25x6, 16 pages of b&w photos, 240 pages.

~~~ Thanks to the foresight of the authors, Voices in Flight is a literary memorial to the hugely gallant men who fought their war in small dangerous and vulnerable aero planes.
~~~ We hear told the stories and thoughts of not only pilots but ground crew and others closely associated with this form of combat. These interviews bring home vividly the camaraderie, the humor, the sadness but above all the thrill of flying experienced by members of the RFC and later the fledgling RAF. First hand accounts of dog fights make graphic reading. This is a never-to-be repeated opportunity to honor the memories of old aviators by bringing their experiences to the attention of younger generations.

$39.95










click to enlarge Franks, Norman and Andy Saunders. MANNOCK: The Life and Death of Major Edward Mannock VC, DSO, MC, RAF. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Grub Street, 2008). 6.75x9.5, b&w illustrations throughout, 192 pages.

~~~ Arguably the highest scoring R.A.F. fighter pilot of the First World War, Edward ‘Mick’ Mannock’s life, and most particularly his death, are still shrouded in mystery. Did he achieve as many victories as are sometimes ascribed to him? How did he die? Where did he die, and more pertinently, where do his remains now lie?
~~~ Respected investigative historians Norman Franks and Andy Saunders have assessed all the evidence and cut through the speculation to build up a complete picture of the man and his achievements as a fighter pilot. Having unearthed much new and enlightening information, they present herein, perhaps the first truly balanced overview of his life.
~~~ Vitally, they now also reveal exactly where Mannock VC fell in battle ninety years ago, and have now begun a quest to persuade the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to accept their findings, published here for the first time, along with numerous original photographs.

$45.00





click to enlarge [Mannock] Ira Jones. KING OF AIRFIGHTERS: The Biography of Major "Mick" Mannock, VC, DSO MC. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Casemate/Greenhill, 2009). 4.75x7.5, 16 pages b&w photographs, 256 pages.

~~~ Ira Jones’ biography of Britain’s top scoring ace of World War I has become the subject of some controversy over the last few years, most notably as it is the source of the claim of 73 “kills” for Mannock, thereby making him the number one scoring Allied Ace of the war. Later research has thrown serious doubt on this claim and indeed Mannock himself only claimed 51 kills.
~~~ Jones’s biography is nevertheless an important account, especially when seen in the context of the time in which it was first written. In particular the biography delves into the mind of Mannock, portraying the singular nature of his character and the true stress that these pioneer air fighters experienced in the last few months of the war.
~~~ Originally published in 1934 by Ivor Nicholson and Watson in London, the book has been reprinted (most recently in the 1990’s by Greenhill Books as part of it’s Vintage Aviation Library) and each time has been reproduced from the original 1930’s version of the book.
~~~ This new Casemate edition has been entirely reoriginated. Not a word has been changed, but the original (very dated) type and page layout have been reworked, as has been the format in which the book is presented, to give a beautiful new treatment to this classic of aviation literature.

$29.95











click to enlarge McCudden, Major James T.B. FLYING FURY: Five Years in the Royal Flying Corps. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Casemate/Greenhill, 2009). 4.75x7.5, b&w photographs, 288 pages.

~~~ James McCudden was an outstanding British fighter ace of World War I, whose daring exploits earned him a tremendous reputation and, ultimately, an untimely end. Here, in this unique and gripping firsthand account, he brings to life some of aviation history’s most dramatic episodes in a memoir completed at the age of twenty-three, just days before his tragic death.
~~~ During his time in France with the Royal Flying Corps from 1914 to 1918, McCudden rose from mechanic to pilot and flight commander. Following his first kill in September 1916, McCudden shot down a total of fifty-seven enemy planes, including a remarkable three in a single minute in January 1918. A dashing patrol leader, he combined courage, loyalty, and judgment, studying the habits and psychology of enemy pilots and stalking them with patience and tenacity.
~~~ Written with modesty and frankness, yet acutely perceptive, Flying Fury is both a valuable insight into the world of early aviation and a powerful account of courage and survival above the mud and trenches of Flanders. Fighter ace James McCudden died in July 1918, after engine failure caused his plane to crash just four months before the end of World War I. His success as one of Britain’s deadliest pilots earned him the Victoria Cross.

$29.95






click to enlarge McHardy, Aimée. AN AIRMAN'S WIFE: A True Story of Lovers Separated by War. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Grub Street, 2007). 5.25x8, 320 pages.

~~~ ‘I want him to fly over the edge of the Downs and in at my bedroom window. I want to kiss his mouth.’ So wrote Aimée McHardy of her fighter pilot lover William Bond in 1917. The two enjoyed a racy and passionate life together long before they were married and Aimée speaks of their prewar vagabond existence which included a flat in the Latin Quarter of Paris, a cottage on the Seine and winters in St. Moritz. But then war intervened and Bill went to serve on the Western Front from where, to the ever present sound of gun fire, hardly a day went by without him writing to his sweetheart. Letters of unconditional love which also described in detail his service life and experiences. And Aimée replied in kind.
~~~ By now Bill was a captain and an ace and when, tragically, he was taken from her one July day, she completed her book about their extraordinary love affair as he had urged her to do. It was first published in 1918, hailed as the period classic that it is, and then disappeared without trace, as indeed did Aimée.
~~~ Reissued here in paperback, with helpful annotations, it is as readable and moving today as it was then.

$19.95





click to enlarge McHardy, Aimée. AN AIRMAN'S WIFE: A True Story of Lovers Separated by War. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Grub Street, 2005). 5.25x7.3, 320 pages.

~~~ Bill Bond went to serve as a fighter pilot on the Western Front, from where, to the ever present sound of gun fire, hardly a day went by without him writing to his sweetheart. They were letters of unconditional love which also described in minute detail his service life and experiences And Aimée replied in kind. By now Bill was a captain and an ace, and when, tragically, he was taken from her one July day, she completed herbook about their extraordinary love affair as a kind of release to enable her to contain the pain of her loss.

$29.95




click to enlarge Revell, Alex, BRITISH SINGLE-SEATER FIGHTER SQUADRONS ON THE WESTERN FRONT IN WORLD WAR I. NEW copy, hardcover issued without dustjacket, laminated pictorial boards. 8.5x11. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 2006). Over 530 b&w photographs, 496 pages.

~~~ This is the story of the single-seater fighter operations over the Western Front flown by the fighter pilots of Great Britain and her Commonwealth. Along with their opposite numbers from Germany and her allies, these pilots of the Royal Flying Corps, the Royal Naval Air Service and later, the Royal Air Force, were the world’s first fighter pilots. The Great War of 1914-1918 saw the advent of a new type of warfare. For the first time in history the aeroplane was to play an important and vital role in the pursuit of war. The stalemate of trench warfare on the Western Front, where trenches stretched from the coast of Belgium to the borders of Switzerland, saw aeroplane reconnaissance as the only way to observe the activities of the opposing side, a task previously carried out by cavalry. It was imperative that these two-seater observation/reconnaissance aeroplanes were prevented in carrying out their vitally important tasks and destroyed – in effect to deny the enemy his ‘eyes’. Fast ‘fighter’ aeroplanes were used to carry out this task, which led to each side attempting to protect their reconnaissance aeroplanes with fighter aeroplanes of their own. It was the beginning of a new type of warfare – aerial combat.


$69.95



click to enlarge Rogers, Les, BRITISH AVIATION SQUADRON MARKINGS of WORLD WAR I. NEW copy, hardcover issued without dustjacket, laminated pictorial boards. 8.5x11. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 2000). Over 800 b&w photographs, 150 color profiles, 296 pages.

~~~ Years in the making, this book covers the wide variety of markings used by British aviation units in World War I. Organized numerically by squadron number the book includes both textual and photographic examples for nearly all RFC, RAF, and RNAS squadrons. Many of the photographs are published here for the first time, and the color profiles offer a representative selection of units, aircraft, and color schemes. A classic book.


$69.95



Samson, Charles R., FLIGHTS AND FIGHTS. NEW copy, hardcover issued without dustjacket. Battery Press, 1990; reprint of the original 1930 edition. Photographs, maps, 372 pages.
~~~ Samson was a pioneer airman in the British Royal Navy. This memoir covers his varied service incl with armoured cars in Belgium August to November of 1914. Then he flew RNAS aircraft on raids from Belgium Nov. 1914 ro Feb. 1915. He then transfered to the Mediterreanean where he flew seaplanes at Gallipoli March to Dec. 1915. He commanded the seaplance carrier BEN-MY-CHREE which operated against the Turks off the palestine coast May 1916 to Jan 1917 until sunk by a submarine. His final assignment was CO of the Great Yarmouth air station in England in the last year of the war.


$19.95



Tennant, LtCol John E., IN THE CLOUDS ABOVE BAGHDAD: The Air War in Mesopotamia, 1916-1918. NEW copy, hardcover issued without dustjacket. Battery Press, 1991; reprint of the original 1920 edition. Photographs, maps, 289 pages.
~~~ The author commanded all British RFC forces in Mesopotamia during 1916-18. He reorganized the aviation units and rapidly obtained air superiority over the Turkish forces. He chronicles his being shot down and captivity near the end of the war. A rare study of aerial operations in a far flung theater of war.


$24.95




click to enlarge Sheldon, Jack. BRITISH & ALLIED AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURERS OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Amberley, 2011). 152 b&w illustrations. 7x10, 256 pages.

~~~ At the start of the First World War, little thought had been given to how aircraft would play a part in the conflict. The Royal Flying Corps consisted of five squadrons, one equipped with observation balloons and the others with aircraft. In fact, so advanced was Britain that its squadrons were the first in the world. Along with the Royal Flying Corps, Britain also had the Royal Naval Air Service, which pioneered the use of aircraft carriers. The value of aircraft was soon realized and rapid expansion took place of both services, each using a variety of aircraft from Sopwith Pups and Camels, to Bristol F.2Bs and the huge Handley page O/400 bombers, as well as Vickers Vimys, Martinsyde G.100s and Avro 504s. With a wide range of aircraft of all types, from fighters to bombers, seaplanes and reconnaissance types, the British air forces started the war with barely 150 aircraft but ended it with thousands.
~~~ Terry Treadwell takes us through the various types, their uses and history, and this companion to his German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers is profusely illustrated with images of the men and machines that protected the skies of the Allied territories.

$27.95




Westrop, Mike, , A HISTORY OF NO. 6 SQUADRON ROYAL NAVAL AIR SERVICE IN WORLD WAR I. NEW copy, hardcover issued without dustjacket, laminated pictorial boards. 8.5x11. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 2006). Over 170 b&w photographs & color profiles, 224 pages.
~~~ Despite No.6 Squadron RNAS being the first British fighter squadron to deploy a production twin gun scout on the Western Front (beating the Royal Flying Corp’s elite 56 Squadron by a couple of weeks) and the first squadron to take the notoriously unreliable Siddeley Puma powered D.H.9 into battle, almost nothing has been published about the activities of this important Royal Naval Air Service squadron. The lack of published information can perhaps be explained by the fact that a large block of the squadron’s daily reports are inexplicably missing from their “box” in Britain’s National Archives. After much effort and time, Mike Westrop discovered the “missing” documents in a Royal Flying Corps War Diary. This pilots’ log books, and many previously unpublished photographs has enabled the author to produce the first in-depth look at the activities and accomplishments of this “forgotten” squadron. The Royal Naval Air Service had a reputation for fielding the most colorful Allied machines in France and Belgium, and the reputation was upheld by the Nieuport scouts of No.6 Squadron. A collection of superb new colour profiles from Mark Miller depicts the squadron’s Nieuport 17Bis scouts to perfection.


$59.95



Westrop, Mike, , A HISORY OF NO. 10 SQUADRON ROYAL NAVAL AIR SERVICE IN WORLD WAR I. NEW copy, hardcover issued without dustjacket, laminated pictorial boards. 8.5x11. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 2004). Over 100 b&w photographs, 160 pages.
~~~ No.10 Squadron of England's Royal Naval Air Service was formed at St. Pol, a suburb of Dunkerque, in February 1917, as part of the rapid naval aviation expansion programme required by the Royal Naval Air Service?s commitment to assist the Royal Flying Corps on the Western Front. Seconded to the Royal Flying Corps and initially flying the ?state of the art? Sopwith Triplane, the squadron?s predominantly Canadian pilots established an enviable reputation and created the legend of the Black Flight that is still discussed today. A change in aircraft to the Sopwith Camel at the end of August, kept the squadron at the cutting edge of technology, but a major disagreement over carrying out the Royal Flying Corps orders resulted in an unscheduled return to Naval control in October. The squadron remained under Naval control until the April 1, 1918, when the Royal Naval Air Service and the Royal Flying Corps were amalgamated into the fledgling Royal Air Force. This volume provides the detailed history of this squadron?s activities, combat claims, accidents and fatalities, aircraft and markings, pilots, and ground officers.


$59.95




click to enlarge [Wilson] Donal MacCarron. LETTERS FROM AN EARLY BIRD: The Life and Letters of Denys Corbett Wilson, 1882-1915. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Pen & Sword, 2006). 9.25x6, 60 b&w in plate section, 224 pages.

~~~ ‘I want him to fly over the edge of the Downs and in at my bedroom window. I want to kiss his mouth.’ So wrote Aimée McHardy of her fighter pilot lover William Bond in 1917. The two enjoyed a racy and passionate life together long before they were married and Aimée speaks of their prewar vagabond existence which included a flat in the Latin Quarter of Paris, a cottage on the Seine and winters in St. Moritz. But then war intervened and Bill went to serve on the Western Front from where, to the ever present sound of gun fire, hardly a day went by without him writing to his sweetheart. Letters of unconditional love which also described in detail his service life and experiences. And Aimée replied in kind.
~~~ By now Bill was a captain and an ace and when, tragically, he was taken from her one July day, she completed her book about their extraordinary love affair as he had urged her to do. It was first published in 1918, hailed as the period classic that it is, and then disappeared without trace, as indeed did Aimée.
~~~ Reissued here in paperback, with helpful annotations, it is as readable and moving today as it was then.

$39.95









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