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Aronowitz, Stanley, FROM THE ASHES OF THE OLD: American Labor and America's Future . NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. (Houghton Mifflin: 1998). 342 pages.

~~~ Examines the decline of the labor movement in the past 25 years and its recent reemergence as a major force in the country's economic and political life. To succeed, Aronowitz argues, labor must return to the social-movement unionism of Eugene Debs and Walter Reuther. He calls for a bold new agenda, covering the principal challenges facing the labor movement today: to organize in the South and among the working poor, to unionize white-collar and technical employees, and to reestablish labor's political independence.

$25.00



Bernstein, Irving, A CARING SOCIETY: The New Deal, the Worker, and the Great Depression -- A History of the American Worker, 1933-1941. VG/VG. Houghton Mifflin, 1985. Photographs, tables, notes index, 338 pages.

~~~ "This brilliant book combines social history, labor history, and a history of the New Deal. A panoramic view of those 'Grapes of Wrath' days, it makes clear how and why we created welfare, social security, unemployment insurance, and the rest of the safe guards we fight over so bitterly today.
~~~ In a fascinating tapestry of voices and events, Bernstein inteweaves the thoughts of migrant workers and cabinet officers, laborers and policy makers, to give us the New Deal years from a new perspective. We see the development of the welfare safeguards against the raw suffering and despair that brought them about.
~~~ A living social history of the Depression years, this important book focuses on the tragic impact of the Great Depression on people throughout the nation, and traces the creation of 'the caring society' to cope with social chaos."

$30.00







Watson, Bruce, BREAD & ROSES: Mills, Migrants, and the Struggle for the American Dream. . NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (NY: Viking Books, 2005). 352 pages.

~~~ From Kirkus Reviews: A vivid work of labor history, recounting a famed textile workers' strike of 1912. Lawrence, Mass., was a major center of textile manufacture in the early 1900s, and most of the work was done by immigrants -- Italians, Portuguese, Greeks and others whom a nativist magazine called "the off-scourings of Southern Europe . . . [who] will not be assimilated [and] have no sympathy with our institutions." Apparently, journalist Watson records, one of those institutions was poor pay. The textile makers, organizing under the banner of radical labor unions such as the Industrial Workers of the World (which, Watson writes, "seemed to show up whenever labor unrest began to smolder"), complained about wages and working conditions, eliciting the response of another institution: when the workers went on strike in the winter of 1912, the mill owners prevailed upon the state to send in the militia, as if to lend credence to Jay Gould's observation, "I can hire one half of the working class to kill the other half." Violence ensued, and workers died, including one Italian woman whom Watson nominates for residence in a Tomb of the Unknown Immigrant. Naturally, the violence was blamed on the workers. The strikers won wide sympathy, however, when they sent their hungry children down to New York City to stay with relatives; when the kids returned six or seven weeks later, well covered by the press, "they were plump -- some had gained a dozen pounds or more-and well clothed." That was evidence enough to suggest to at least some contemporaries that the immigrants were indeed being misused, and in the wake of what has come to be known as the 'Bread and Roses' strike, the textile workers actually came out ahead: theleading plant agreed to raise wages, to pay extra for overtime work and to rehire even the most vocal of the homegrown activists. And so it was-at least for a time, when bosses across the land returned with a vengeance. A fine reconstruction of events now too little remembered.

$24.95







Brody, David,. IN LABOR'S CAUSE: Main Themes on the History of the American Worker. . NEW copy. Trade PAPERBACK. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993). 272 pages.

~~~ These extended essays by one of the preeminent scholars in U.S. labor history discuss central questions in the field, from the colonial period to the present: What do the first demands for a fixed workday tell us about how early American workers experienced the beginnings of the industrial revolution? Why did American labor politics never manage to break the grip of the two-party system? What was the impact of ideology, career leadership, and ethnicity on the American labor movement? How did American trade unionism cope with the market-drive forces of American capitalism? Why did so great a national crisis as World War II have so modest an impact on labor-capital-state relations in America? And finally, how did the struggle for industrial unionism produce the highly formalized "adversarial" system of workplace representation that many observers today see as one of the prime obstacles to American competitiveness in the new global economy? The book's essay structure permits detailed exploration of significant issues, while its wide chronological range and emphasis on causation broaden its scope to embrace major themes and trends. Like Brody's Workers in Industrial America (Second Edition, Oxford, 1993), In Labor's Cause makes an important contribution toward a comprehensive interpretation of the history of workers in America, and will be a fundamental component of any U.S. survey course, as well as courses in American labor or economic history.

~~~ Paperback edition currently in print at 44.95; hardcover in print at $67.00.

$35.00


Brooks, Robert R.R., WHEN LABOR ORGANIZES. (NY: Arno & the New York Times, 1971). Reprint of the 1937 Yale University Press edition as part of the series: "American Labor -- From Conspiracy to Collective Bargaining, Series II". EX-LIBRARY (with usual stamps & stickers), hardcover, no dust jacket. Illustrations, photographs, appendices, notes, bibliography, index. 361 pages. click to enlarge

~~~ (from a review written in 1937): "Comprehensive in scope, judicial in tone, and written with a keen sense of humor, When Labor Organizes shows sympathy for the labor movement combined with ability to see both sides of the argument and penetration in the evaluation of the motives of both parties to the conflict. It describes and analyzes, realistically and objectively, the process of organization, the structure, the functions, and the programs of the unions, the techniques they use in their efforts to get what they want, and those of the counter attack by anti-union employers. The author points out in this connection that the primary function of the union is not to strike, but to establish bargaining and business relations with the employer; many strikes occur because of the refusal of employers to permit this function to operate. The logic of the situation, he believes, will cause industrial unions to supplant craft uinions. He concludes that the economic program of labor "contains revolutionary implications in that it transfers power from ownership to labor and from management to the leaders of labor. It also directs the loyalties of workers toward a new set of social symbols" founded on a desire for security and dignity as well as on demands for better wages and hours (p. 230). He thinks that political parties organized on a territorial basis fail to express fundamental economic needs, and that a more satisfactory alignment can be based on economic classes. The largest group whose interests might lead them to agree upon a specific program consists of those who work with their heads or their hands for wages or salaries. Discarding combinations with existing parties or with the farmers as ineffective or dangerous to the interests of labor, he suggests a party resting primarily on the unions, and provides it with a tentative platform. A useful appendix gives the numerical strength and affiliations of the unions in the United States in 1936-1937..."

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$25.00


Burnett, John (ed), USEFUL TOIL: Autobiographies of Working People from the 1820s to the 1920s. (Routledge: 1994). NEW copy; trade PAPERBACK. 377 pages.

~~~ . . . engages freshly and directly with the "ordinary" people of the 19th century. John Burnett has assembled 27 telling extracts from the diaries and autobiographies of working people--wheelwrights and stone-masons, miners and munition workers, butlers and kitchen maids, navvies, carpenters, potters and ship assistants to list only a few. The men and women who speak in these pages concentrate on their working experiences, though they also write about their homes and their fears.

~~~ Burnett's broad and sympathetic introductions focus and contextualize the wealth of material. These stories provide the antithesis of "great name" history, yet they constantly touch on human experiences that are timeless and universal.

~~~ This edition currently in print at $47.95.

$40.00

NF. Butler, Elizabeth Beardsley, WOMEN AND THE TRADES: Pittsburgh, 1907-1908. Pittsburgh: 1984, 1st edition, U of Pittsburgh Press. (Pittsburgh series in Labor History). Near fine Trade Paperback; illustrations. 560 pp.

~~~ Women and the Trades has long been regarded as a masterwork in the field of social investigation. Originally published in 1909, it was one of six volumes of the path breaking Pittsburgh Survey, the first attempt in the United States to study, systematically and comprehensively, life and labor in one industrial city. No other book documents so precisely the many technological and organizational changes that transformed women's wage work in the early 1900s. ~~~ Despite Pittsburgh's image as a male-oriented steel town, many women also worked for a living-rolling cigars, canning pickles, or clerking in stores. The combination of manufacturing, distribution, and communication services made the city of national economic developments. ~~~ What Butler found in her visits to countless workplaces did not flatter the city, its employers, or its wage earners. With few exceptions, labor unions served the interests of skilled males. Women's jobs were rigidly segregated, low paying, usually seasonal, and always insecure. Ethnic distinctions erected powerful barriers between different groups of women, as did status hierarchies based on job function. ~~~ Professor Maurine Weiner Greenwald's introduction provides biographical sketches of Butler and photographer Lewis Hine and examines the validity of Butler's assumptions and findings, especially with regard to protective legislation, women worker's “passivity,” and working-class family strategies.

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$17.50





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Dobbs, Farrell, TEAMSTER REBELLION. VG. Trade PAPERBACK. (NY: Pathfinder, 1995), 7th printing.

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$10.00







Rosenberg, Daniel, NEW ORLEANS DOCKWORKERS: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923. Albany: 1988, 1st edition, SUNY Press. Near fine Pictorial boards.
~~~ From The Journal of American History: "Rosenberg has shown that, despite the prevalence of black economic suppression on the waterfronts of other southern cities (especially Galveston, Texas), New Orleans had a different pattern of biracial interaction in the workplace. While demonstrating the ways that New Orleans was unique among southern port cities, Rosenberg unnecessarily narrowed his study. In his provocative Black Coal Miners in America {BRD 1988} Ronald L. Lewis found similar biracial solidarity in Alabama in the same period. . . . Rosenberg had the opportunity todiscuss a phenomenon broader than the New Orleans dock experience to strengthen an already convincing argument about past possibilities for biracial cooperation between black and white laborers. This criticism, however, is made about a solid and provocative exploration of an important and fascinating aspect of American labor history."

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$35.00


Wellman, David, THE UNION MAKES US STRONG: Radical Unionism on the San Francisco Waterfront. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket (Cambridge, 1995), 384 pp.

~~~ Preface;
Part I. Labour Radicalism Revisited: ~~
1. Unsettling old scores: labour radicalism encounters conventional wisdom; ~~
2. Sealing the fate of radical labour theoretically; ~~
3. Socialism with its working clothes on: a framework for American unionism;

Part II. Local Community and 'Tumultuous' Democracy: The Socio-Cultural Foundations of Unionism on the San Francisco Waterfront: ~~
4. 'None of us is smart as all of us': political community on the San Francisco waterfront; ~~
5. The structure of participationist politics; ~~
6. Being political in Local 10;

Part III. Unionism, Work, and Technological Change: ~~
7. Work, knowledge, and control: conventional longshoring; ~~
8. Work, knowledge, and control: containerised longshoring; ~~
9. 'Doing the right thing': working principles and codes of conduct;

Part IV. Waging the Battle for Workplace Control on Contractual Terrain: ~~
10. Who decides how to work?; ~~
11. Which side's language shall govern?; ~~
12. By whose principles will merit be rewarded?;

Part V. Agreeing to Disagree: Being Defensibly Disobedient: ~~
13. Translating troubles into grievable issues; ~~
14. 'We essentially have no contract with you': keeping the agreement; ~~
15. Constructing and maintaining the appearance of cooperation;

Conclusion: the ILWU: trade union exceptionalism or prefigurative politics?;

Appendix; Bibliography.

~~~ In print at $109.

$95.00





Eggert, Gerald G., HARRISBURG INDUSTRIALIZES: The Coming of Factories to an American Community. Fine/fine. (University Park: PSU Press, 1993), 1st edition. Illustrations.

~~~ Currently in print at $49.50.

$30.00


Fink, Gary M. and Merl E. Reed (editors), RACE, CLASS, AND COMMUNITY IN SOUTHERN LABOR HISTORY. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket, still in shrinkwrap. (University of Alabama Press, 1994). 320 pages.

From the publisher: "Under the leadership of Gary M Fink and Merl E. Reed, Georgia State University has hosted the Southern Labor Studies Conferences approximately every two years. The conferences have yielded two previous volumes, published in 1977 and 1981, and this volume, which contains selected papers from the seventh conference held in 1991. As evidenced by the quality of these essays, the field of southern labor history has come into its own. Research interest is peaking: the practitioners are younger scholars, and much of their work emphasizes the new social and political history. While the topics covered in this volume usually reflect that methodology, their chronology ranges from the antebellum period to the 1970s, suggesting the variety of sources and changing research approaches that can be used in rendering new meaning to the past. Although the subject of gender was generally a minor theme in these sessions, work now being done leaves no doubt that at some future conference gender will attract a commanding amount of attention. In introducing and describing their respective areas, the associate editors, Robert M. Zieger (textile workers), Joe W. Trotter Jr., (African Americans), and Clifford M. Kuhn (labor politics), have provided a rich historiographical background. The essays in this volume will enlighten the reader on many important aspects of the history of southern labor, and they will also raise new questions to be explained by other scholars and future conferences."

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$40.00


Freeman, Joshua B., WORKING-CLASS NEW YORK: Life and Labor since World War II. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (New Press, 2000). 409 pages.

~~~ The moving story of the creation by workers and their allies of a local social democracy, remarkable in its ambitions and achievements, and the ways it came crashing down. "Once seen from this perspective, Gotham will never look the same again." -- Mike Wallace.

$35.00

Fung, Archon, Joel Rogers and Tessa Hebb (eds), WORKING CAPITAL: The Power of Labor's Pensions. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Cornell University Press, 2001). 288 pages.

~~~ U.S. pension funds are now worth more than $7 trillion, and many people believe that the most important task for the labor movement is to harness their share of this capital and develop strategies that will help, rather than hurt, workers and unions. Working Capital challenges money managers and today's labor movement by asking how workers' hard-earned savings can be put to use in socially and economically progressive ways. Responsible management of pensions will create greater growth and prosperity in America, and the authors of Working Capital show that the long-term interests of pension plan beneficiaries are well served through a "worker-owners" view of the economy.
~~~ This book builds on the work of the Heartland Forum supported by the United Steelworkers of America, the AFL-CIO's Center for Working Capital, and several foundations, including the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation, to draw together the wisdom of a number of experts on labor's next best moves in the pension market.

CONTRIBUTORS:

~~Dean Baker, Center for Economic and Policy Research
~~Eric Becker, Trillium Asset Management
~~Michael Calabrese, New America Foundation
~~Archon Fung, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University
~~Leo W. Gerard, United Steelworkers of America
~~Teresa Ghilarducci, University of Notre Dame
~~Tessa Hebb, Hebb, Knight and Associates
~~David Mackenzie, United Steelworkers of America
~~J. W. Mason, Center for Working Capital, AFL-CIO
~~Patrick McVeigh, Trillium Asset Management
~~Marleen O'Connor, Stetson University College of Law
~~Bill Patterson, AFL-CIO
~~Damon Silvers, AFL-CIO
~~Jayne Zanglein, George Meany Center for Labor Studies

~~~ Currently in print at $39.95.


$35.00


Goldberg, Roberta, ORGANIZING WOMEN OFFICE WORKERS: Dissatisfaction, Consciousness, and Action. (NY: Praeger Publishers, 1983). EX-LIBRARY (with usual stamps & stickers), hardcover, no dust jacket. Notes, bibliography, index, 152 pages.

~~~ “Roberta Goldberg's Organizing Women Office Workers provides further evidence that women workers can and increasingly are organizing themselves. By examining the genesis and development of different levels of consciousness, Goldberg identifies the basis for collective action among working women. She demonstrates that while patriarchy and capitalism structure women's work experience, they also provide the potential for the rise of a militant working women's movement.... The heart of Goldberg's analysis, and perhaps the most significant aspect of her book, is her examination of the interaction between class and gender consciousness.... Based on her finding that a matrix of feminist and class consciousness co-exist, Goldberg supports her claim that gender mediates class consciousness and class action....important for everyone interested in the failure of, and potential for, a revolutionary working class movement.”–Review of Radical Political Economics

~~~ Currently in print at $82.95.

$40.00


Gould, William B., PRIMER ON AMERICAN LABOR LAW. NEW copy, trade PAPERBACK. (MIT, 1997). Third Edition.

~~~ Since its publication more than a decade ago, A Primer on American Labor Law has served as an easily accessible guide to the development, principles, and characteristics of American labor law. The third edition incorporates a number of significant developments that have taken place since 1986. These include new precedent under the Railway Labor Act (covering both railroads and airlines), the expansion of wrongful discharge litigation (which has become increasingly important as the unorganized sector of the work force continues to expand), new forms of protection against discrimination afforded by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Civil Rights Act of 1991, the consent decree between the U.S. Department of justice and the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, and the continued success of unions representing professional athletes. William B. Gould IV is Charles A. Beardsley Professor of Law at Stanford Law School. An impartial arbitrator of labor disputes since 1965, he was a member of the Clinton Administration's Committee on the Future of Worker-Management Relations. He is the author of Agenda for Reform: The Future of Employment Relationships and the Law.

$30.00







Green, James, DEATH IN THE HAYMARKET: A Story of Chicago, the First Labor Movement, and the Bombing That Divided Gilded Age America. . NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (NY: Knopf, 2006). Illustrated throughout with engravings & photographs, 400 pages.

~~~ On May 4, 1886, a bomb exploded at a Chicago labor rally, wounding dozens of policemen, seven of whom eventually died. Coming in the midst of the largest national strike Americans had ever seen, the bombing created mass hysteria and led to a sensational trial, which culminated in four controversial executions. The trial seized headlines across the country, created the nation's first red scare and dealt a blow to the labor movement from which it would take decades to recover.
~~~ Death in the Haymarket brings these remarkable events to life, re-creating a tempestuous moment in American social history. James Green recounts the rise of the first great labor movement in the wake of the Civil War and brings to life the epic twenty-year battle for the eight-hour workday. He shows how the movement overcame numerous setbacks to orchestrate a series of strikes that swept the country in 1886, positioning the unions for a hard-won victory on the eve of the Haymarket tragedy. ~~~ As he captures the frustrations, tensions and heady victories, Green also gives us a rich portrait of Chicago, the Midwestern powerhouse of the Gilded Age. We see the great factories and their wealthy owners, including men such as George Pullman, and we get an intimate view of the communities of immigrant employees who worked for them. Throughout, we are reminded of the increasing power of newspapers as, led by the legendary Chicago Tribune editor Joseph Medill, they stirred up popular fears of the immigrants and radicals who led the unions.
~~~ Death in the Haymarket is an important addition to the history of American capitalism and a moving story about the class tensions at the heart of Gilded Age America.

~~~ From Publishers Weekly: As Green thoroughly documents, the bloody Haymarket riot of May 4, 1886, changed the history of American labor and created a panic among Americans about (often foreign-born) "radicals and reformers" and union activists. The Haymarket demonstration, to protest police brutality during labor unrest in Chicago, remained peaceful until police moved in, whereupon a bomb was thrown by an individual never positively identified, killing seven policemen and wounding 60 others. Shortly after, labor leaders August Spies and Albert Parsons, along with six more alleged anarchists, stood convicted of murder on sparse evidence. Four of them went to the gallows in 1887; another committed suicide. The surviving three received pardons in 1893. The Knights of Labor, at that time America's largest and most energetic union, received the blame for the riot, despite a lack of conclusive evidence, and many Knights locals migrated to the less radical American Federation of Labor. Labor historian Green (Taking History to Heart) eloquently chronicles all this, producing what will surely be the definitive word on the Haymarket affair for this generation. Green is particularly strong in documenting the episode's long aftermath, especially the decades-long efforts of the white Parsons's black wife to exonerate her husband.

$26.95


click to enlarge Green, James, MISSING FROM HAYMARKET SQUARE. . NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Atheneum, 2001). 144 pages.

~~~ From Publisher's Weekly: "In setting her latest historical novel against the backdrop of the struggle for fair labor practices in 1886 Chicago that culminated in the Haymarket Riot, Robinet (Walking to the Bus-Rider Blues; Forty Acres and Maybe a Mule) creates a story that is alternately engaging and far-fetched. Plucky 12-year-old Dinah and her two immigrant Austrian friends, siblings Ben, 16, and Olive, 12, work 12-hour days in factories to feed their families. Since the three dollars a week they make is not enough to cover rent and food, they 'humbug' the wealthy district pedestrians and pickpocket them. Dinah, an African-American descended from royalty in Africa, is proud of her heritage and her father's key role in the labor movement. When her father's name is placed on a blacklist and he disappears, Dinah and her friends discover he has been imprisoned by Pinkertons (detectives hired by factory owners), and they decide to rescue him. Unfortunately, many of Dinah's movements and schemes seem contrived to set her in the middle of historical events, her political commentary appears overly sophisticated and her relationship with her parents is not developed (consequently, her mother's change of heart from bitterness to generosity comes as a shock, for instance). However, young readers willing to accept some unlikely twists will appreciate the relationship of the three sympathetic and resourceful friends and learn about a lesser-known aspect of U.S. history. Ages 8-12."

$16.00









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Stavis, Barrie, THE MAN WHO NEVER DIED: A Play about Joe Hill. VG+/VG+. Slight edgewear to jacket, corners neatly clipped, in mylar. Book itself clean inside & out. (NY: AS Barnes & Company, 1972). New revisions by author. Publisher's note, lengthy preface by author (new material for this edition), introduction by Pete Seeger. Photographs, appendix of songs, 157 pages.

~~~ The Man Who Never Died takes place in a period of extreme disparity between the wealthy few and the massive population of increasingly unemployed and homeless poor, many of whom were recent immigrants. It was a time, as Will Rogers said, when "Ten men in our country could buy the whole world and ten million couldn't buy enough to eat."

$25.00


Stegner, Wallace, JOE HILL: A Biographical Novel. NEW copy; trade PAPERBACK. (Penguin: 1990). 384 pages.

~~~ A remarkable portrait of one of American labor's most enduring legends
~~~ Blending fact with fiction, Wallace Stegner retells the story of Joe Hill - the Wobbly bard who became the stuff of legend when, in 1915, he was executed for the alleged murder of a Salt Lake City businessman. Organizer, agitator, "Labor's Songster" - a rebel from the skin inwards, with an absolute faith in the One Big Union - Joe Hill fought tirelessly in the frequently violent battles between organized labor and industry. But though songs and stories still vaunt him and his legend continues to inspire those who feel the injustices he fought against, Joe Hill may not have been a saintly crusader, and may have been motivated by impulses darker than the search for justice.
~~~ Joe Hill is full-bodied portrait of both the man and the myth: from his entrance into the short-lived Industral Workers of the World union, the most militant organization in the history of American labor, to his trial, imprisonment, and final martyrdom - his last words to the I.W.W., "Don't waste time mourning. Organize."

$16.00









Burgoyne, Arthur G., THE HOMESTEAD STRIKE OF 1892. . VG- (former owner's stamp to endpaper). Trade PAPERBACK. (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1982), 2nd printing. Illustrations.

~~~ The violent events of 1892 during the Homestead strike stand together as one of the great dramatic moments in American labor history....In 1893 Arthur Burgoyne, one of Pittsburgh's most skilled and sensitive journalists, published Homestead, a complete history of the strike.... This new edition, published under a new title, is heavily illustrated with period pictures.

~~~ Currently in print at $15.95.

$12.50


Demerest, David P., ed., THE RIVER RAN RED: Homestead 1892. VG+ Large trade PAPERBACK. (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1992), 1st Edition. Illustrations.

~~ An anthology of newspaper clippings, sermons, photographs, cartoons, and other contemporary sources pertaining to the lockout and strike at the Carnegie steelworks in Homestead, Pennsylvania, in 1892.

~~~ From Library Journal: "July 6, 1992 will mark the 100th anniversary of the most significant labor-management confrontation in U.S. history: the Homestead Strike. In commemoration of this industrial crisis, Demarest (Carnegie-Mellon) and eight coeditors have produced an anthology of events surrounding the conflict. The numerous illustrations include photographs, cartoons, and period engravings. The text, which includes excerpts from magazine and newspaper articles, Congressional testimony, and speeches and memoranda, reveals the viewpoints of some major players: industrialists Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick, unionist John McLuckie, and anarchists Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman. Although this anthology contains a wealth of information, it lacks an index to guide the reader to specific material in the text."

$18.50











[Jones] Steel, Edward M., ed., THE COURT-MARTIAL OF MOTHER JONES. Lexington: 1995, 1st edition, University Press of Kentucky. As new Trade Paperback $16.50

$16.50




Kimeldorf, Howard, BATTLING FOR AMERICAN LABOR. NEW copy, TRADE PAPERBACK. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995), 244 pages. ~~~ "This study of Philadelphia longshoremen and NYC culinary workers offers a new interpretation of American labor history. Challenging received thinking about rank and file workers and the character of their unions, Kimeldorf argues that organized labor's reliance upon worker self-organization and direct economic action can be seen as a kind of syndicalism."

$19.95


Levenstein, Harvey A., LABOR ORGANIZATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES AND MEXICO. (Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Company, 1971). EX-LIBRARY (with usual stamps & stickers), hardcover, no dust jacket. Notes, bibliography, index, 258 pages.

~~~ Currently in print at $110.95.

$35.00


Lorwin, Lewis L., THE AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR: History, Politics, and Prospects.. NEW copy, hardcover issued without dust jacket. (Clifton, NJ: Augustus M. Kelley Publishers, 1972), reprint of the original 1933 edition. Page-end notes throughout, appendices, bibliography, index, 573 pages.

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$35.00


click to enlarge [Meany] Archie Robinson GEORGE MEANY AND HIS TIMES: A Biography. (NY: Simon & Schuster, 1981). EX-LIBRARY (with usual stamps & stickers), hardcover with dust jacket in mylar protector. Photographs, notes, bibliography, index, 445 pages.

~~~ Originally published at $18.95, now OUT OF PRINT.

$25.00







Baters, Beth Tompkins, PULLMAN PORTERS AND THE RISE OF PROTEST POLITICS IN BLACK AMERICA, 1925-1945 . NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2001). Photographs, notes, bibilography, index, 275 pages.
~~~ Between WW I and WW II, African Americans' quest for civil rights took on a more aggressive character as a new group of black activists challenged the politics of civility traditionally embraced by old-guard leaders in favor of a more forceful protest strategy. The author focuses on the struggle of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) to form a union in Chicago, headquarters of the Pullman Company. ~~~ Bates shows how the BSCP overcame initial opposition from most of Chicago's black leaders by linking its union message with the broader social movement for racial equality. As members of BSCP protest networks mobilized the black community around the quest for manhood rights and economic freedom, they broke down resistance to organized labor even as they expanded the boundaries of citizenship to include equal economic opportunity. By the mid-1930s, BSCP protest networks gained platforms at the national level, fusing Brotherhood activities first with those of the National Negro Congress and later with the March on Washington Movement. Lessons learned during this era guided the next generation of activists, who carried the black freedom struggle forward after World War II.
~~~ From the Chicago Tribune: "A splendid study. . . . By skillfully placing the union efforts of anonymous railway workers in their proper place at the forefront of the 20th Century struggle for black civil rights, Beth Tompkins Bates has given us a book of inspiring vision. This is an American story worth remembering and celebrating."

~~~ Currently in print at $49.95.

$45.00




Rasmussen, Barhara, ABSENTEE LANDOWNING AND EXPLOITATION IN WEST VIRGINIA 1760-1920. Lexington: 1994, 1st edition, U of Kentucky Press. As new/as new Black boards

$27.50


Rice, Charles Owen, FIGHTER WITH A HEART: Writings of Charles Owen Rice, Pittsburgh Labor Priest. . Pittsburgh: 1996, 1st edition, U of Pittsburgh Press. As new in as new dust jacket. Black boards; illustrations. From the Publisher: "[The book] provides ample evidence of [Rice's] gift for words, trenchant prose, and passionate commitment. . . . This book documents the story of one of the more colorful and admirable Irish-American figures to serve the cause of peace and justice in the 20th century. The likes of him are evermore in need today." --Irish Edition.

~~~ Currently in print at $49.95.

$35.00

Salmond, John A., MISS LUCY OF THE CIO: The Life and Times of Lucy Randolph Mason, 1882-1959. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. (University of Georgia Press, 1988). Notes, bibliography, index, 227 pages.

~~~ Mason was a feminist, social activist, and spokesperson for the CIO {Congress of Industrial Organizations}. Salmond examines her career, . . . liberal beliefs, and {what the author sees as her}ability to use other people's stereotypes of an elite Southern lady for the benefit of working people's causes.

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$25.00


Schneirov, Richard, PRIDE AND SOLIDARITY: A History of the Plumbers and Pipefitters of Columbus, Ohio, 1889-1986. Ithaca: 1993, 1st edition, ICR/Cornell U Press. Near fine/near fine maroon boards; illustrations. Table of Contents as follows: Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Windows into the Union; The Power of Organization, 1889-1902; The Union Takes Shape, 1901-1945; Building a Stronger and Fairer Union, 1945-1973; A Fight for Survival: The Nonunion Challenge, 1970-1989; E Pluribus Unum: Faces in the Union; Appendix; Bibliography; Index.

~~~ Currently in print at $45.00.

$35.00


Sims, Patsy, CLEVELAND BENJAMIN'S DEAD: A Struggle for Dignity in Louisiana's Cane Country. Athens: 1994, 1st edition, U of Georgia Press. as new/as new Gold boards; photographs by Mitchel L. Osborne.
~~~ From Booknews: Sims (writing, U. of Pittsburgh) chronicles daily life in a community of Louisiana sugar cane workers in the 1970s and their struggles to sue the Department of Agriculture over irregularities in their wages. Using a mix of journalism and oral history, she investigates the workers' substandard housing and inadequate job safety, and covers a tragic accident in which a worker is killed beneath an overturned tractor. This second edition restores two complete chapters omitted from the first edition (Elsevier-Dutton, 1981), and adds an epilogue updating the story through 1992. Includes b&w photos. Lacks an index and a bibliography.

~~~ In Print at $30.00.

$27.50


Stadum, Beverly, POOR WOMEN AND THEIR FAMILIES: Hard Working Charity Cases 1900-1930 . Albany: 1992, 1st edition, SUNY Press. Near fine. Brown and white boards.

$30.00


Stanley, David T., MANAGING LOCAL GOVERNMENT UNDER UNION PRESSURE. (Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution, 1972). EX-LIBRARY (with usual stamps & stickers), hardcover, no dust jacket. Appendices, bibliography, index, 177 pages.

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$20.00







Brody, David,. LABOR IN CRISIS: The Steel Strike of 1919 . University of Illinois Press, 1987. NEW copy. PAPERBACK. Bibliographical essay, notes, index, 218 pages.
~~~ This book explores the events that culminated in the memorable steel strike of 1919. It assesses the roles of management, the trade unions, the industrial workers, the government, and the public. It seeks to explain why unionization failed before the New Deal era. And, by extension, it may illuminate a larger puzzle: why did mass-production unionism succeed when it did? The examination of a movement that failed has its historical uses.

~~~ Currently in print at $16.95.

$16.00

Eggert, Gerald G., STEELMASTERS AND LABOR REFORM, 1886-1923. University of Pittsburgh Press, 1990. NEW copy. Hardcover without dust jacket, as issued. Still in shrinkwrap. "... provides an inside view of top steel officials arguing their positions on various reforms under consideration ~ stock purchase plans, employer liability, employee representatiion, and elimination of the twelve-hour shift and seven-day work week.

~~~ In print at $49.95.

$30.00


McKiven, Jr., Henry M., IRON AND STEEL: Class, Race and Community in Birmingham, Alabama, 1875-1920. Chapel Hill: 1995, 1st edition, U of NC Press. Near fine Trade Paperback; illustrations. From The Journal of American History: "A competent study of an important southern working-class community, Iron and Steel argues that 'the caste system, and the ideology of white supremacy that supported it, was essential to the defense' of the class interests of white workers. But because the book considers only the history of the iron and steel industry, it offers a startlingly incomplete portrait of working-class race relations in Birmingham. . . . {McKiven's} research appears solid, and the persistence of white working-class racism is well documented. But the example of iron workers is profoundly misleading. Anyone with a passing acquaintance with Birmingham will be struck by the absence of workers from the district's largest industry, coal mining, in which Black and white skilled workers laboredtogether. . . . Acknowledging this side of Birmingham's race relations would have forced McKiven to make a more subtle argument."

~~~ Currently in print at $19.95.

$15.00


Rogovin, Milton and Michael Frisch, PORTRAITS IN STEEL . Ithaca: 1993, 1st edition, Cornell U Press. Near fine Large trade Paperback; illustrations.
~~~ From Choice: "Rogovin, an award-winning documentary photographer, and Frisch (SUNY, Buffalo), a major American oral historian, have combined to create an artistic and scholarly treatment of 'deindustrialized' workers from the Buffalo steel mills. . . . The result is a moving set of documentary photographs, from the 1970s and '80s, reminiscent of the work of the famous group associated with Roy Stryker and the Farm Security Administration (FSA) during the New Deal. To these are added sensitive, well-edited, and revealing interviews. They remind readers that terms like 'deindustrialization' involve people, and that it is people who endure both the joy and the sorrow that are the fabric of history.

~~~ Currently in print at $33.50.

$25.00


UNITED STEELWORKERS OF AMERICA STEEL LABOR. Indianapolis: Jan. 1956-Dec. 1960, 1st edition, United Steelworkers of America. VG-(four bumped corners) Rebound journals; oversize; dense; volumes 21-25; fascinating $200.00

$200.00


UNITED STEELWORKERS OF AMERICA STEEL LABOR. Indianapolis: Jan. 1951-Dec. 1955, Ist edition, United Steelworkers of America. G+(hinge loose, light wear to boards) Rebound journals; oversize; illustrations; dense; volumes 16-20. fascinating material. $200.00

$200.00


Walker, Charles R., STEELTOWN: An Independent Case History of the Conflict Between Progress and Security. NY: 1950, 1st edition, Harper and Brothers. G+( a few smudges to boards, light wear to top edge of spine) Grey boards.

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$20.00




Stieber, Jack, PUBLIC EMPLOYEE UNIONISM: Structure, Growth, Policy. (Washington, DC: The Brookings Institute, 1973). EX-LIBRARY (with usual stamps & stickers), hardcover, no dust jacket. Appendices, index, 256 pages.

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$20.00

Steinfeld, Robert J., COERCION, CONTRACT AND FREE LABOR IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY . NEW copy. Trade PAPERBACK. (Cambridge: 2001). 342 pages.

~~~ Presents a fundamental reassessment of the nature of wage labor in the 19th century, focusing on the use of sanctions to enforce wage labor agreements. Steinfeld argues that wage workers were not employees at will but were often bound to their employment by enforceable labor agreements, which employers used whenever available to manage their labor costs and supply.

~~~ Currently in print at $37..

$35.00


Stromquist, Shelton . A GENERATION OF BOOMERS: The Pattern of Railroad Labor Conflict in 19th-century America . NEW copy, trade PAPERBACK. (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1993), 1st edition, NEW copy. Illustrations, bibliography, index.

From Choice: "This is an account of the "railroad strikes between 1877 and 1894, specifically those in the growing western communities. . . . {The book discusses the} fabric of social and fraternal associations, the railway brotherhoods, and other craft organizations, and {attempts to} relate workplace, community, and the larger political economy. It examines management strategies vis-a-vis labor, the structure of the railway industry, the life of the . . . mobile train hand, the 'boomers,' and their place in the social and civic life of the community."

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$15.00







Bender, Daniel E. & Richard A. Greenwald (eds). SWEATSHOP USA: The American Sweatshop in Historical and Global Perspective . VG, trade PAPERBACK. One corner of cover slightly bent, otherwise in nearly new condition. (NY: Routledge, 2003). Photographs, 300 pages.
~~~ A collection 13 scholarly essays, plus introduction by the editiors. Notes accompany each essay. Overall index at rear.
~~~ For over a century, the sweatshop has evoked outrage and moral repugnance. Once cast as a type of dangerous and immoral garment factory brought to American shores by European immigrants, today the sweatshop is reviled as emblematic of the abuses of an unregulated global economy. This collection unites some of the best recent work in the interdisciplinary field of "sweatshop studies." It examines changing understandings of the roots and problems of the sweatshop, and explores how the history of the American sweatshop is inexorably intertwined with global migration of capital, labor, ideas and goods. The American sweatshop may be located abroad but remains bound to the United States through ties of fashion, politics, labor and economics. The global character of the American sweatshop has presented a barrier to unionization and regulation. Anti-sweatshop campaigns have often focused on local organizing and national regulation while the sweatshop remains global. Thus, the epitaph for the sweatshop has frequently been written and re-written by unionists, reformers, activists and politicians. So, too, have they mourned its return.

~~~ This paperback edition currently in print at $33.95. Our price $25.00.

$25.00


Harris, William H., KIDS AT WORK: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor . NEW copy. TRADE PAPERBACK. Photographs, 112 pages. Photobiography of early twentieth-century photographer and schoolteacher Lewis Hine, using his own work as illustrations. Hines's photographs of children at work were so devastating that they convinced the American people that Congress must pass child labor laws.

$9.95




Theriault, Reg, THE UNMAKING OF THE AMERICAN WORKING CLASS (New Press: 2003). NEW copy; hardcover with dust jacket. 211 pages.
~~~ Tells the story behind the disappearance of blue-collar work in America, giving both a humorous picture of working-class labor and a devastating indictment of the forces that threaten it.

$24.95


Thomas, Keith , OXFORD BOOK OF WORK . Oxford: 2001. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. 640 pages.
~~ From Forbes FYI: This magnificent book represents the rarest ocurrence in all of publishing: an instant treasure. Sir Keith Thomas, the former president of the British Academy, has worked very hard indeed to compile these hundred of thoughtful passages that, taken together, represent the total spectrum of the complicated feelings we have about our jobs...our reasons for being, as much as we might protest the notion. Dead-end jobbers looking for cynical humor will find what they want here, as will titans of industry looking for inspirational hymns to labor's inherent nobility. There's genuine wisdom and thoughtfulness on all of these pages about nothing less than our roles and responsibilities as human beings living in societies.

~~~ Hardcover edition OUT OF PRINT. (Paperback edition currently in print at $17.95).

$35.00







Fink, Gary M., THE FULTON BAG AND COTTON MILLS STRIKE OF 1914-1915 . Ithaca: 1993, 1st edition, ICR/Cornell U Press. Near fine/near fine green boards; illustrations. From the Publisher: "Mill operatives walked off their jobs at Atlanta's Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills complex in the spring of 1914, initiating a strike that involved not only the class conflict inherent in a labor-management dispute, but also ethnic confrontations, gender divisions, social and economic reforms, regional and sectional differences, and the textile industry's rendition of the gospel of efficiency. The year-long strike that followed was singularly well documented, partly by the reports of labor spies paid by management to gather information about striking employees and disrupt union organizing activities. Closely following dramatic confrontations in the northeastern textile industry, the Fulton Bag strike attracted national attention, drawing teams of investigators from the United States Department of Labor and from the United States Commission."

~~~ Currently in print at $29.95. Our price: $25.00

$25.00




[Trevellick] Obadiah Hicks, LIFE OF RICHARD F. TREVELLICK, THE LABOR ORATOR or HARBINGER OF THE EIGHT-HOUR SYSTEM. (NY: Arno & the New York Times, 1971). Reprint of the 1896 J.E. Williams & Company edition as part of the series: "American Labor -- From Conspiracy to Collective Bargaining, Series II". EX-LIBRARY (with usual stamps & stickers), hardcover, no dust jacket. 222 pages.
~~ Richard F. Trevellick (1830-1895), served as president of the Ship Carpenters' & Caulkers' International Union (1865), president of the Detroit Trades Assembly (1869), president of the National Labor Union (1871) and president of Labor's Political League (1872). Trevellick was the first great labor "agitator," orator and organizer in America.

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$25.00




A Significant Anniversary in
American labor history




Hurwitz, Johanna, DEAR EMMA . NEW copy; hardcover with dust jacket. (Harper Collins). Illustrated by Barbara Garrison. 150 pages.
~~~ In her letters to a Vermont friend, eighth grader Dossi, a Russian, Jewish immigrant living in the Lower East Side of New York City in 1910, shares her thoughts about her new brother-in-law, the diphtheria epidemic, and the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire. Ages 8-12

$16.00


McClymer, John F., THE TRIANGLE STRIKE AND FIRE. VG-. Trade PAPERBACK. Covers a little curled, corners no longer crisp. Interior clean. (NY: Harcourt Brace College Publishers, 1998). Profusely illustrated. "Guide to Further Research", index, 194 pages.
~~~ From the publisher: "THE TRIANGLE STRIKE AND FIRE is the first volume in the AMERICAN STORIES series of brief books. Focusing on dramatic historical events, the books in this series include a broad range of primary materials that engage students' imaginations and challenge them with the same interpretive and methodological issues that historians grapple with in seeking to make sense of the past. The stories chosen represent intersections of several important historical developments. For example, the Triangle Strike (1909) and Fire (1911) are key events in various approaches to U.S. history: women's studies, labor history, cultural studies, and ethnic studies."

~~~ This paperback textbook edition currently IN PRINT AT $63.95.

$20.00


Von Drehle, David, TRIANGLE: The Fire that Changed America . NEW copy; trade PAPERBACK. (Atlantic Monthly Press). 340 pages.
~~~ On March 25, 1911, as workers were getting ready to leave for the day, a fire broke out in the Triangle Shirtwaist factory in New York's Greenwich Village. Within minutes it spread to consume the building's upper three stories. With ladders too short for a rescue, firemen had to watch in horror, along with hundreds on the street, as desperate workers jumped to their deaths. The final toll was 146 people - 123 of them women. It was the worst industrial disaster in New York City history until 9/11.

$14.00


Auch, Mary Jane, ASHES OF ROSES . NEW copy; hardcover with dust jacket. (Sagebrush Education Resources). 250 pages.
~~~ Sixteen-year-old Rose Nolan and her family are grateful to have finally reached America, the land of opportunity. But their happiness is shattered when part of their family is forced to return to Ireland. Rose wants to succeed and stays in New York with her younger sister Maureen. The sisters struggle to survive and barely do so by working at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. Then, just as Rose is forming friendships and settling in, a devastating fire forces her, Maureen, and their friends to fight for their lives. Surrounded by pain, tragedy, and ashes, Rose wonders if there is anything left for her in this great land of America.

$14.45










Halker, Clark D., FOR DEMOCRACY, WORKERS AND GOD: Labor Song-Poems and Labor Protest, 1865-1895. Urbana: 1991, 1st edition, U of IL Press. New in new dust jacket. Maroon boards. From The American Historical Review: "Through the peephole of a single form of popular expression, Clark D. Halker leads his readers on a most enjoyable review of a robust period of American labor protest. His vehicle is the labor song-poem that regularly adorned the pages of the nation's far-flung labor press in the post-Civil War years. . .. Analytically, perhaps Halker's major contributions lie both in his renewed emphasis on Christian influence within the labor movement and in his shrewd characterization of the eclipse of the autonomous culture of the song-poem by the rise of more commercially produced, popular entertainment. Although the labor poets willingly savaged every convenient foe, Halker's account suggests that they saved their most precious venom for capitalistic greed outfitted in Sunday Christianity.

~~~ Currently in print at $29.95.

$25.00




Vargas, Zaragosa, PROLETARIANS OF THE NORTH: A History of Mexican Industrial Workers in Detroit and the Midwest, 1917-1933 NEW copy; trade PAPERBACK. (California: 1993). 277 pages.
~~~ Tells the story behind the disappearance of blue-collar work in America, giving both a humorous picture of working-class labor and a devastating indictment of the forces that threaten it.

$32.95

Vorse, Mary Heaton, STRIKE! University of Illinois Press, 1991. NEW copy. PAPERBACK. Introduction by Dee Garrison. Novel by radical journalist Mary Heaton Vorse (1874-1966) who covered union uprisings from 1912 on. Novel based on the Loray Mill strike in Gastonia, North Carolina in the late 1920s. 236 pages.

$15.00


Werstein, Irving, THE GREAT STRUGGLE: Labor in America. (NY: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1965). EX-LIBRARY (with usual stamps & stickers), hardcover, no dust jacket. Illustrations, bibliography, index, 190 pages.

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$20.00


Wilentz, Sean, CHANTS DEMOCRATIC: New York City & the Rise of the American Working Class, 1788-1850. NEW copy, hardcover issued without dust jacket. (Oxford University Press, 2004), 480 pages.
~~~ Since its publication in 1984, Chants Democratic has endured as a classic narrative on labor and the rise of American democracy. In it, Sean Wilentz explores the dramatic social and intellectual changes that accompanied early industrialization in New York. He provides a panoramic chronicle of New York City's labor strife, social movements, and political turmoil in the eras of Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson. Twenty years after its initial publication, Wilentz has added a new preface that takes stock of his own thinking, then and now, about New York City and the rise of the American working class.
REVIEWS:
~~~ "The best book yet written about the emergence of New York City's working class and a major contribution to American working-class history." --The New Republic
~~~ "[Chants Democratic] has no equal in breadth of subject, grace of style or acuity of interpretation." --The Nation
~~~ "Wilentz has written the statement on Jacksonian New York.... A great leap forward in both American social and American political history." --Journal of American History
~~~ "A remarkable book that will quickly establish itself in the historiography and exert a powerful influence on the future direction of social, labor, and political history." --Journal of Interdisciplinary History

~~~ Currently in print at $70.00.

$55.00


Wolkinson, Benjamin W., BLACKS, UNIONS, AND THE EEOC: A Study of Administrative Futility. (Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1973). EX-LIBRARY (with usual stamps & stickers), hardcover, no dust jacket. Notes, bibliography, index, 175 pages.

~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$20.00


Woollacott, Angela ON HER THEIR LIVES DEPEND: Munitions Workers in the Great War. Berkeley: 1994, 1st edition, U of Ca Press. VG+ Trade Paperback; illustrations.
~~~ In this evocative book, Angela Woollacott analyzes oral histories, workers' writings, newspapers, official reports, and factory song lyrics to present an intimate view of women munitions workers in Britain during World War I. Munitions work offered working-class women—for the first time—indepence, a reliable income, even an improved standard of living. But male employers and trade unionists brought them face-to-face with their subordination as women within their own class, while experiences with middle-class women co-workers and police reminded them of their status as working class. Woollacott sees the woman munitions worker as a powerful symbol of modernity who challenged the gender order through her patriotic work and challenged class differences through her increased sping power, mobility, and changing social behavior.

~~~ Currently in print at $22.95.

$20.00


Zandy, Janet, ed., CALLING HOME: Working Class Women's Writing. New Brunswick: 1993, 2nd printing, Rutgers U Press. VG Trade paperback; illustrations From The Nation: "{The authors'} stories are about labor itself, harsh and unremitting, as well as the relationships that emerge in a life defined by that toil. Wherever each narrative stands on the register of literary intention and achievement,the cumulative effect is an eloquent case for the claims of these stories as literature. Collectively, they even suggest that there is a whole, as yet unnamed kind of literature that voices the working-class female narrative.

~~~ Currently in print at $18.00.

$12.50


Zieger, Robert H., AMERICAN WORKERS, AMERICAN UNIONS, 1920-1985. (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986). EX-LIBRARY (with usual stamps & stickers), hardcover, no dust jacket. Bibliography, index, 233 pages.
~~~ From the publisher: "Highly acclaimed and widely read, American Workers, American Unions (first published in 1986, revised ed. 1994) provides a concise and compelling history of American workers and their unions in twentieth-century America. This new edition features new chapters on the pre—1920 period, as well as an entirely new final chapter that covers developments of the 1980s and 1990s in detail. There the authors explore how economic change, union stagnation, and antilabor policies have combined to erode workers' standards and labor's influence in the political arena over the last two decades. They review current "alternatives to unionism" as means of achieving fair workplace representations but insist that strong unions remain essential in a democratic society. They argue that labor's new responsiveness to the concerns of women, minority groups, and low-wage workers, as well as its resurgent political activism, offer new hope for trade unionism."

~~~ Paperback (3rd Ed) currently in print at $22.

$20.00


Zieger, Robert H., THE CIO, 1935-1955. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997). NEW copy, trade PAPERBACK. Photographs, nearly a hundred pages of notes, index, 491 pages.
~~~ From Library Journal: "Ziegler (history, Univ. of Florida) has written a comprehensive history of the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) from its founding in 1935 as a break-away from the American Federation of Labor (AFL) until the merging of the two federations in 1955. He analyzes the stormy relations between the rival labor groups, the CIO's complex dealing with governmental authorities, and its successes and failures in organizing workers and negotiating labor contracts. Vivid warts-and-all portraits are painted of the CIO's leaders, notably founding father John L. Lewis and Walter Reuther, who dominated the CIO in its later years. Characterizing the CIO as a "fragile juggernaut," Ziegler deals with its internal problems of structure and finances and the debilitating effects of its battles with Communist elements in its ranks."

~~~ This paperback edition currently in print at $29.95. Our price $25.00.

$25.00








ABRAHAM LINCOLN ON LABOR

“I am glad to know that there is a system of labor where the laborer can strike if he wants to. I would to God that such a system prevailed all over the world.” — Abraham Lincoln, from a speech in Hartford, Conn., on March 5, 1860.

“Inasmuch as most good things are produced by labor, it follows that all such things of right belong to those whose labor has produced them. But it has so happened, in all ages of the world, that some have labored, and others have without labor enjoyed a large proportion of the fruits. This is wrong, and should not continue. To secure to each laborer the whole product of his labor, or as nearly as possible, is a worthy object of any good government.— from notes Lincoln made on tariff policy on Dec. 1847.

Labor is prior to and independent of capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital, and deserves much the higher consideration. Capital has its rights, which are as worthy of protection as any other rights. Nor is it denied that there is, and probably always will be, a relation between labor and capital producing mutual benefits.” –- Abraham Lincoln, State of the Union address, Dec. 3, 1861.