WALKS FIFTY MILES ON CORK LEG TO ENLIST

Muskogee, Oklahoma, July 1917

After walking over fifty miles to enlist in the Marine Corps, John Franklin was rejected in Muskogee, Oklahoma, due to his cork leg. Franklin told Sgt.Herrman that he had been plowing on a farm near Wilberton, Okla., but that he did not have enough money to pay his railroad fare to Muskogee. Consequently he walked, working from house to house for his meals. His cork leg was noticeable only after he was stripped.



ETHAN ALLEN, USMC

Butte, Montana, July 1917

Ethan Allen, a direct descendent of the original Ethan Allen, of Fort Ticonderoga fame, was accepted for enlistment in the Marine Corps at Butte, Montana, on June 28. Allen has been principal of the school at Whitehall, Montana for the past three years and has also taught in Ohio and North Dakota.






MOTHER BEGS MARINE CORPS TO TAKE HER SON

Buffalo, N.Y., July 1917

To Sergeant George B. McGee, I am the mother of a very unruly boy. He is 17 years last August, most 6 feet in height, never been sick a day, and I would like very much to enlist him in the Marines at once. I must do something before it is too late. He just came home to me drunk and my heart is broken. I can't see this sorrow any longer: he is getting worse every day. Can you send a man here that could enlist him? Now please answer this.

(Sgd.) H.L.V.




RECRUITER MISTAKEN FOR CIGAR SALESMAN

Memphis, Tennessee, July 1917

The metal signs are all right, but I believe that other recruiters will agree with me that they should be larger and changed in one respect, i.e., by showing a picture of a Marine or some similar illustration. The following incident will bear out this point. C.B. Starne, boatswain's mate, 1st class, of the Navy recruiting station and myself were out the other day tacking up these signs, and went into a store to ask permission to tack them on the fence. The owner came out and asked to see one of the signs, and the one he saw was the Marine Corps sign. He said that I was the first "cigar salesman" he had ever seen that wore a uniform and he asked if I was advertising for "U.S. Marine cut plug tobacco".

Sgt. Baumgras, USMC



MARINES BREAK RULE TO ACCEPT HARVARD GIANT

Boston, Mass., June 14, 1918

Francis Parkman, the giant Harvard oarsman, will be a Marine provided the Corps can furnish a big enough uniform. Parkman is 6 ft. 4 in. in height, two inches above the maximum in the Marine Corps. When he applied for enlistment a few days ago after the Harvard crew had defeated Yale, the recruiting officers were so enthusiastic over his splendid physical condition they telegraphed Washington for special permission to waive the rule limiting the height of recruits. Today, authorization to enlist the athlete was received with the stipulation "provided you can fit him with a uniform."




HARVARD'S FOOTBALL CAPTAIN A MARINE

Boston, Mass., July 1917

Harvard's great Eddie Mahon was accepted for enlistment in the Marine Corps on June 27, at Boston. Mahan led Harvard's eleven against Yale in 1915 and delivered the "Bull Dog" its biggest walloping.




CRACK YALE ATHLETES JOIN MARINE CORPS

New Haven, Conn., May 8, 1917

Five of Yale's leading athletes, of whom four have captained Yale teams, are today enrolled for service with the Marines. They are Harry Le Gore, the baseball captain and football star; Holcomb York, of the hockey team; Louis Ferguson, who captained one of Yale's best swimming teams, and Johnny Overton, the track and cross-country team captain and cross-country inter-collegiate champion. All four will receive temporary commissions. Rex Hutchinson, the football center and baseball outfielder, has also joined the Marine Corps.




CIVIL WAR MARINE VOLUNTEERS

Recruiters' Bulletin, April 1917

John P. Fredd, a prosperous farmer of Pottstown, Pa., and a Civil War Marine, aged 72, has offered his services to the Major General Commandant in such capacity as he is suited.



ALL DECKED OUT

Salt Lake City, Utah, June 1917

On May 24 I did a little advertising for the Marine Corps through the use of a show wagon in the parade of the Hagenback & Wallace Circus. On the back of the wagon I had a Marine Corps recruiting flag and on both sides had a storm flag. Wagon was otherwise decorated with flags and pictures and I rode on top. My companion was an Arab in native dress. I distributed literature along the line of march. The wagon was the best in the show and was drawn by eight horses.
Sgt. Frank R. Busch, USMC



Most of the material for this page
is derived from

Volume I, Number 1

Scuttlebutt & Small Chow:
An Irregular Quarterly
of the Old Corps
"Marine Corps Recruiting
in the World War
1917-18"


To return to
Marine Corps Historical Galleries:
World War I